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The Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station in Japan. Japan’s nuclear regulator announced on 23 September that Tokyo Electric Power Company is fit to operate the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station, based on new legally binding safety rules the company drafted and pledged to follow.

If Tepco is found to be in breach of the rules, it could be ordered to halt the station’s operations, press reports in Japan said.

Local governments must agree in the coming months to restart the seven-unit station in Niigata Prefecture, northwestern Japan.

Kashiwazaki Kariwa was not affected by the earthquake and tsunami which damaged Fukushima-Daiichi in 2011. The station’s reactors were all offline at the time following a 2007 earthquake which damaged the site but did not damage the reactors themselves.

Date: Friday, 25 September 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/regulator-says-tepco-is-fit-to-operate-kashiwazaki-kariwa-nuclear-power-station-9-4-2020

Mihama-3 and Takahama-1 could now operate for 60 years The Takahama nuclear power station in Japan. Work has been completed to extend the operational lifetime of the Mihama-3 and Takahama-1 nuclear power reactors in Fukui Prefecture, western Japan, both of which are owned and operated by Kansai Electric Power Company.

Mihama-3 began commercial operation in December 1976 and Takahama-1 in November 1974.

Press reports in Japan said Kansai Electric plans to bring Mihama-3 back online in January 2021, and the other, Takahama-1, in March 2021, although approvals will be needed from local governments.

The two reactors have been authorised by the nuclear regulator to run beyond the usual limit of 40 years, which the government introduced after the 2011 Fukushima-Daiichi disaster.

Date: Tuesday, 22 September 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/work-complete-to-extend-operation-of-two-reactors-9-1-2020

Safety improvement work to enable Mihama unit 3 and Takahama unit 1 - both in Japan's Fukui Prefecture - to operate for an additional 20 years, to 60 years, has now been completed, Kansai Electric Power Company announced today. Work needed to extend the operation of unit 2 of the Takahama plant continues.

Date: Saturday, 19 September 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Kansai-completes-upgrade-work-at-two-reactors

UK-based Horizon Nuclear Power announced that it will cease its activities to develop nuclear new-build projects at Wylfa Newydd on Anglesey and at Oldbury on Severn in South Gloucestershire. This followed the decision by Horizon’s parent company, Japan’s Hitachi Ltd, it would end business operations on the UK NPP construction project, which was suspended in January 2019.

Date: Friday, 18 September 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newshorizon-to-cease-activities-on-uk-nuclear-projects-8136080

The nuclear industry has merely scratched the surface of the flexible benefits of nuclear power, according to panellists in a conference held this week ahead of the 11th Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM11). The CEM11 side-event, Flexibility in Clean Energy Systems: The Enabling Roles of Nuclear Energy, included high-level speakers from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), as well as government officials from Canada, the UK and the USA. Hosted by Saudi Arabia, CEM11 will take place on 22 September.

Date: Friday, 18 September 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Nuclears-flexibility-is-the-magic-to-create-a-clea

Hitachi announced today it will end its business operations on the Wylfa Newydd nuclear power plant construction project, which it had suspended in January 2019 "because it was clear that further time was needed to decide on a financing structure". Horizon Nuclear Power, the UK project developer that Hitachi acquired in November 2012, said it will now take steps for the "orderly closing down" of all its current development activities, but will "keep the lines of communication open" with government and other key stakeholders regarding future options at both its sites, which in addition to Wylfa Newydd on Anglesey, include Oldbury on Severn in South Gloucestershire.

Date: Thursday, 17 September 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Hitachi-withdraws-from-UK-new-build-project

The recent shutdown of six nuclear reactors at South Korea’s Kori and Wolsong nuclear power plants during the typhoons Maysak and Haishen resulted from the failure of power supply equipment, caused by salinity carried on the wind, Hankyoreh reported on 11 September, citing an independent investigation by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP).

Date: Tuesday, 15 September 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newssix-korean-reactors-shut-down-due-to-salinity-during-recent-typhoons-8132674

Japan’s Electric Power Development Co (J-Power) has announced further delays to construction of its Ohma nuclear power palnt in Aomori Prefecture, which is designed to operate solely on plutonium-uranium mixed oxide mox fuel.

Date: Tuesday, 15 September 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfurther-delays-for-japans-ohma-8132683

€400m plant, backed by international donors, will provide safe storage for a minimum of 100 years Hot testing has begun at the €400m ISF-2 facility at Chernobyl. Courtesy EBRD. Hot testing has started at the Interim Storage Facility 2 (ISF-2) in Chernobyl where spent nuclear fuel from reactors 1, 2 and 3 at the destroyed nuclear station will be processed and stored in the world’s largest nuclear dry storage once full operations have started.

The start of hot testing on 10 September was approved by the Ukrainian regulator following the successful completion of previous system-wide trials of the facility, constructed by an international consortium led by the US company Holtec and financed by the international community through the Nuclear Safety Account, managed by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD).

The processing and storage of the spent nuclear fuel at Chernobyl is one of the key remaining tasks at the site. While the 1986 accident destroyed reactor 4, the more than 21,000 fuel assemblies used in the RMBK-type reactors 1, 2 and 3 were removed in the following years and provisionally stored in a wet pond facility.

The new ISF-2 will replace the current site storage arrangements, providing safe storage for a minimum of 100 years. A purpose-built special train will transport the spent nuclear fuel assemblies to the ISF-2 facility where they will be cut, dried and packaged into double-walled canisters in the specially designed processing facility and – finally – transferred to the newly constructed onsite storage modules.

Date: Saturday, 12 September 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/hot-testing-begins-at-isf-2-interim-spent-fuel-facility-9-5-2020

A major effort to develop and deploy clean energy technologies worldwide is urgently needed to meet international energy and climate goals, particularly in order to reduce carbon emissions from areas beyond the power sector such as transport, buildings and industry, according to a new International Energy Agency report released today. Meanwhile, the Paris-based agency's chief economist, Laszlo Varro, told participants in World Nuclear Association’s Strategic eForum 2020 yesterday that nuclear power "makes the energy transition more cost-effective and more energy secure".

Date: Friday, 11 September 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Urgent-need-for-nuclear-in-global-energy-transitio