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"The US uranium mining industry has the personnel and yellowcake processing plants on standby, and is ready to expand into new areas with discoveries that will provide hundreds of years of available uranium resources from a variety of secure sources," says Michael D. Campbell, chairman of the Uranium (Nuclear & REE) Committee of the Energy Minerals Division of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). "So let the drilling and processing begin."

Date: Friday, 25 December 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/US-uranium-miners-ready-to-support-nuclear-power,

US company Energy Fuels Inc will become a commercial rare earths supplier in 2021, having entered into a three-year supply agreement to acquire a minimum of 2500 tons per year of natural monazite sands from which it will also recover uranium at its White Mesa mill in Utah. Separately, Vancouver-based International Consolidated Uranium Inc said it had been attracted to its newly announced acquisition of the Laguna Salada uranium project in Argentina by the by-product vanadium.

Date: Wednesday, 16 December 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Uranium-companies-attracted-by-REE-and-vanadium

File photo of work at the Onkalo repository in Finland. Courtesy Posiva. Nuclear regulator Stuk has notified authorities in other countries that Finland intends to begin the final disposal of used nuclear fuel in the mid-2020s.

Stuk said it had notified countries that have supplied Finland with uranium for its nuclear power plants.

Stuk said normal verification inspections of nuclear materials cannot be performed once the materials have been finally disposed of, and so procedures related to inspections must be specified before final disposal begins.

Since Finland started up its first nuclear power reactors in the early 1970s, it has mainly sourced uranium from Russia, Australia, Canada and the US. Stuk maintains a national database of nuclear materials and oversees nuclear safeguards in Finland. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the European Commission control Finnish operations to ensure that they comply with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

Date: Saturday, 07 November 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/regulator-notifies-fuel-supply-countries-of-final-disposal-plans-11-5-2020

Finland's Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) has notified the authorities in charge of radiation safety in the countries that have supplied the country with uranium for its nuclear power plants of Finland's intention to begin the final disposal of used nuclear fuel in the mid-2020s. Normal verification inspections of nuclear materials cannot be performed once the materials have been finally disposed of, and so procedures related to such inspections must be specified before the initiation of final disposal.

Date: Saturday, 07 November 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Finland-notifies-fuel-suppliers-of-final-disposal

US-based fuel technology company Lightbridge Corporation announced that it had received a Notification of Patent Grant from the Korean Intellectual Property Office for a divisional patent application relating to a co-extrusion method of manufacturing Lightbridge four-lobe helically twisted metallic fuel rods, based on its 2011 Patent Cooperation Treaty patent application.

Date: Friday, 28 August 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newskorean-patent-for-lightbridge-8105524

Using the regulated asset base (RAB) model has the potential for cost-overrun that can be somewhat addressed through the 'alliance' model, that is, a model based on one unified agreement under which all parties share the benefits and risks, write Vincent Zabielski and Elina Teplinsky, respectively, special counsel and partner at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.

Date: Wednesday, 08 July 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Viewpoint-Combining-the-RAB-and-alliance-models-fo

Coalition discussion paper says small reactors ‘have potential’ NuScale told an inquiry last year that its SMR design would suit rural areas in Australia. Photo courtesy NuScale. The Australian federal government wants to look at the possibility of deploying small modular reactors as part of its policy to achieve its medium- and long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target as part of its obligation under the 2015 Paris climate agreement.

The nuclear proposal was contained in a discussion paper, released on 21 May, that is part of the ruling Liberal-National party coalition government's policy to detail how it will meet its target of reducing GHG emissions by 26-28% by 2030 from 2005 levels, as well as the broader Paris aim of the globe achieving net-zero emissions.

The discussion paper said emerging nuclear technologies – for example, small modular reactors – have potential but require R&D and identified deployment pathways. “Engineering, cost and environmental challenges, alongside social acceptability of nuclear power in Australia, will be key determinants of any future deployment,” the paper said.

The paper examined more than 140 technologies including hydrogen, renewables, biofuels and carbon capture and storage.

Date: Friday, 22 May 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/government-to-examine-smrs-as-part-of-energy-planning-5-4-2020

Agency schedules webinar and warns of possible shortages at hospitals A researcher at Indonesia’s National Nuclear Agency using a hot cell to prepare a radiopharmaceutical. Courtesy M. Gaspar/IAEA. The production of radioisotopes used to produce radiopharmaceuticals for medical procedures has continued during the Covid-19 pandemic, but hospitals could face shortages due to bottlenecks in transport and distribution, the International Atomic Energy Agency has warned.

An agency survey conducted among operators of research reactors that produce radioisotopes for radiopharmaceuticals shows that most major actors continue to produce radioisotopes because the production facilities have been defined as essential by the relevant governments.

However, many airlines are no longer operating because of the pandemic and borders are closed, which affects the distribution of medical radioisotopes around the world.

Joao Osso Junior, head of the radioisotope products and radiation technology section at the IAEA, said the agency is working to assess the need for medical radioisotopes because most research and education activities using isotopes have been put on hold and many hospitals have delayed diagnosis applications.

Date: Wednesday, 22 April 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/radioisotope-industry-facing-distribution-challenges-says-iaea-4-2-2020

The production of medical radioisotopes has continued during the COVID-19 pandemic but bottlenecks in transport and distribution could lead to shortages at hospitals, according to an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) survey of the research reactors where the isotopes are produced.

Date: Wednesday, 22 April 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Medical-isotope-supply-chain-faces-challenges-from