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The International Energy Agency (IEA) in its latest report, Electricity 2024, dedicates a significant amount of space to nuclear power – a departure from its previous studies which treated it as peripheral. In its press release on the new report, IEA says the increase in electricity generation from renewables and nuclear "appears to be pushing the power sector's emissions into structural decline". Over the next three years, low-emissions generation is set to rise at twice the annual growth rate between 2018 and 2023. Global emissions from electricity generation are expected to decrease by 2.4% in 2024, followed by smaller declines in 2025 and 2026.

Date: Friday, 26 January 2024
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiea-acknowledges-significance-of-nuclear-energy-in-new-report-11463539

The Roadmaps to New Nuclear conference, organised by the French Ministry for Energy Transition and the OECD’s Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in Paris, resulted in two communiques signed by energy ministers and industry representatives emphasising the need for nuclear energy.

Date: Tuesday, 03 October 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfrance-and-nea-host-conference-to-promote-nuclear-energy-11186484

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi has called for the Iranian government to reconsider the decision which affects the planning and conducting of nuclear safeguards verification activities.

Date: Tuesday, 19 September 2023
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Iran-withdraws-further-IAEA-inspector-designations

Sweden demonstrates a solid commitment to ensuring the safe implementation of nuclear radioactive waste and used fuel management activities, including its efforts towards establishing a deep geological facility, an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts has concluded.

Date: Wednesday, 10 May 2023
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-commends-Sweden-s-management-of-radioactive-w

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Review Service for Radioactive Waste & Spent Fuel Management, Decommissioning & Remediation (ARTEMIS) team has concluded a seven-day mission to Sweden. It said Sweden has a comprehensive, robust and well-functioning system for safely managing radioactive waste and used nuclear fuel. The mission, however, advised Sweden to improve its national policies and strategies for non-nuclear radioactive waste that originates, for example, from industrial uses, research, or medical applications.

Date: Friday, 05 May 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-commends-swedens-radwaste-management-10813811

Japan, the UK, Canada, the US and France have agreed to co-operate to reduce dependence on Russia as a supplier of nuclear materials and technology. Their statement was issued at the Nuclear Energy Forum being held in Japan’s Sapporo alongside the meeting of Group of Seven (G7) ministers on climate, energy and environment. It was published on the UK government website.

Date: Thursday, 20 April 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfive-g7-nations-aim-to-cut-dependence-on-russian-nuclear-technology-10770200

Group of Seven (G7) energy and environment ministers, following a two-day meeting in the northern Japanese city of Sapporo, issued a 36-page communique laying out their commitments ahead of a G7 summit in Hiroshima in May. The detailed statement covered sections on environment, climate and energy. It reaffirmed a commitment to accelerating the clean energy transition to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. “We call on and will work with other countries to end new unabated coal-fired power generation projects globally as soon as possible to accelerate the clean energy transition in a just manner,” the statement says, stipulating that countries should rely on “predominantly” clean energy by 2035.

Date: Wednesday, 19 April 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsg7-ministers-reaffirm-net-zero-targets-condemn-russia-and-offer-only-qualified-support-for-nuclear-10770194

Advances in emerging field of ‘theranostics’ are a game-changer Millions of patients around the globe rely on the regular and timely production of diagnostic and therapeutic isotopes produced in research reactors and accelerator facilities. Image courtesy IAEA. Advances in medical isotope diagnostics and therapy are holding promise for cancer patients, despite challenges facing the nuclear medical field in recent years related to radionuclide production and supply, rising costs, and stricter regulation.

Medical isotopes are radioactive substances used in various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to treat various types of cancers and other conditions. They are essential for modern medicine, allowing physicians to visualise and target specific organs, tissues and cells in a patient’s body.

Over more than a decade, personalised medicine using nuclear techniques has been gaining pace, allowing doctors to tailor therapies and treatments to the specific needs and physiology of a patient, and to avoid harm to healthy organs or tissues.

According to Sven Van den Berghe, chief executive of Belgium-based isotope producer PanTera, one technique that has seen significant advances is known as theranostics – the term used to describe the combination of using one radioactive drug to diagnose and a second to deliver therapy to treat the main tumour and any metastatic tumours.

Date: Friday, 14 April 2023
Original article: nucnet.org/news/sector-aims-to-tackle-isotope-supply-problems-as-excitement-grows-over-targeted-therapies-4-4-2023

Renewables together with nuclear power are expected to meet the vast majority of the increase in global electricity demand over the next three years, making significant rises in the power sector's carbon emissions unlikely, according to a new International Energy Agency (IEA) report.

Date: Friday, 10 February 2023
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IEA-highlights-nuclear-s-key-role-in-coming-years