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The US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Nuclear Energy has concluded the first-ever US Africa Nuclear Energy Summit (USANES) in Accra, Ghana. The summit was organised in partnership with Ghana’s Ministry of Energy and the Nuclear Power Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. DOE said it “provided a platform for crucial dialogues and international cooperation on nuclear energy” where “participants from across the continent discussed the future of nuclear power and laid a foundation for sustainable nuclear energy growth in the region”.

Date: Saturday, 11 November 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfirst-us-african-nuclear-summit-concludes-in-ghana-11287149

The operator of the two-unit Penly nuclear power plant in Normandy, France, has demonstrated a commitment to operational safety, an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission has concluded. The team also encouraged the operator, EDF, to continue improvements in areas such as the implementation of maintenance work.

Date: Wednesday, 27 September 2023
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-assesses-operational-safety-at-Penly-plant

According to the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), Saudi Arabia is considering a Chinese proposal to build a NPP. Citing Saudi sources acquainted with the situation, WSJ said China National Nuclear Corp (SNNS) had submitted a bid to construct a nuclear plant in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province, close to the border with Qatar and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Date: Wednesday, 30 August 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newssaudi-arabia-reportedly-considers-chinese-bid-for-npp-11105735

Iran has resolved two outstanding inquiries from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) related to the presence of highly enriched uranium (HEU) particles at several sites. The confidential quarterly report by the IAEA, which is routinely leaked to the press, said inspectors no longer had questions on uranium particles found to be enriched to 83.7% at its underground Fordow facility. This had resulted in tension for the past several months although some resolution was achieved in March following a visit to Tehran by IAEA Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi. Iran had insisted at that time that those particles were a by-product of its current enrichment as particles can reach higher enrichment levels in fluctuations. “The agency informed Iran that, following its evaluation of the data, the agency had assessed that the information provided was not inconsistent with Iran’s explanation ... and that the agency had no further questions on this matter at this stage,” the report said.

Date: Wednesday, 07 June 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-resolves-some-outstanding-issues-with-iran-10918237

Advances in emerging field of ‘theranostics’ are a game-changer Millions of patients around the globe rely on the regular and timely production of diagnostic and therapeutic isotopes produced in research reactors and accelerator facilities. Image courtesy IAEA. Advances in medical isotope diagnostics and therapy are holding promise for cancer patients, despite challenges facing the nuclear medical field in recent years related to radionuclide production and supply, rising costs, and stricter regulation.

Medical isotopes are radioactive substances used in various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to treat various types of cancers and other conditions. They are essential for modern medicine, allowing physicians to visualise and target specific organs, tissues and cells in a patient’s body.

Over more than a decade, personalised medicine using nuclear techniques has been gaining pace, allowing doctors to tailor therapies and treatments to the specific needs and physiology of a patient, and to avoid harm to healthy organs or tissues.

According to Sven Van den Berghe, chief executive of Belgium-based isotope producer PanTera, one technique that has seen significant advances is known as theranostics – the term used to describe the combination of using one radioactive drug to diagnose and a second to deliver therapy to treat the main tumour and any metastatic tumours.

Date: Friday, 14 April 2023
Original article: nucnet.org/news/sector-aims-to-tackle-isotope-supply-problems-as-excitement-grows-over-targeted-therapies-4-4-2023

Bangladesh is committed to continuous improvement of nuclear and radiation safety, an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts has concluded. The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission team identified areas for possible improvements.

Date: Friday, 16 December 2022
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-says-Bangladesh-committed-to-nuclear-safety

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission said Bangladesh is committed to continuous improvement of nuclear and radiation safety. The mission also noted areas where improvements could be made to enhance the national nuclear and radiation safety regulatory infrastructure, as the country constructs its first nuclear power plant (NPP).

Date: Wednesday, 14 December 2022
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-reviews-bangladeshs-regulatory-framework-10433302

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) team found that Zimbabwe has made considerable improvements in its national legal and regulatory infrastructure for nuclear and radiation safety by drafting a new law that addresses the requirements of IAEA international safety standards. The team reviewed progress in Zimbabwe’s implementation of recommendations made during an initial IRRS mission in 2014. The six-day follow-up mission, which ended on 28 May, was conducted at the request of the Zimbabwe Government and hosted by the Radiation Protection Authority of Zimbabwe (RPAZ).

Date: Friday, 03 June 2022
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newszimbabwe-makes-progress-in-meeting-radiation-safety-standards-9745831

Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME) has become the seventh university in the world to offer a programme as part of the International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA), which is endorsed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During a webinar hosted by the IAEA last week, Professor Attila Aszódi, BME programme executive, described the importance of this achievement.

Date: Tuesday, 20 October 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-endorses-Budapest-university-programme