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World leaders gathered in Brussels at the first ever Nuclear Energy Summit co-chaired by the Prime Minister of Belgium Alexander De Croo and the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Rafael Mariano Grossi. The Summit was the highest-level meeting to date exclusively focused on the topic of nuclear energy. It followed inclusion of nuclear energy in the Global Stocktake agreed at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP28) in Dubai in December 2023 and the launch of the IAEA’s Atoms4NetZero initiative.

Date: Wednesday, 27 March 2024
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsnuclear-energy-summit-attracts-world-leaders-11632691

The International Energy Agency (IEA) in its latest report, Electricity 2024, dedicates a significant amount of space to nuclear power – a departure from its previous studies which treated it as peripheral. In its press release on the new report, IEA says the increase in electricity generation from renewables and nuclear "appears to be pushing the power sector's emissions into structural decline". Over the next three years, low-emissions generation is set to rise at twice the annual growth rate between 2018 and 2023. Global emissions from electricity generation are expected to decrease by 2.4% in 2024, followed by smaller declines in 2025 and 2026.

Date: Friday, 26 January 2024
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiea-acknowledges-significance-of-nuclear-energy-in-new-report-11463539

At the 28th Conference of the Parties to the original 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP28), 22 countries signed a declaration supporting tripling nuclear energy capacity by 2050. The document was signed by the heads of state, or senior officials, from Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Ghana, Hungary, Japan, South Korea, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, the UK and the USA. China and Russia did not sign, although they have the world’s fastest growing and most ambitious nuclear power programmes.

Date: Wednesday, 06 December 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newscop28-22-countries-target-tripling-global-nuclear-energy-capacity-by-2050-11347824

"A new clean energy economy is emerging - and emerging much faster than many realise," International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Director Fatih Birol said at the launch of the agency's eighth World Energy Investment report.

Date: Wednesday, 31 May 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiea-report-on-clean-energy-investments-says-little-about-nuclear-10897991

Even oil-rich companies of Middle East are eying reactors, as more nations announce plans for SMRs Russian troops occupied the Zaporizhzhia nuclear station, which was damaged by shelling. File photo courtesy IAEA. 2022 was a year of mega milestones for nuclear energy.

Countries around the world turned to nuclear as a reliable low-carbon energy source as they looked for ways to wean themselves off Russian imports and lower carbon emissions.

New plants began operating, deals for small modular reactors were signed and countries announced ambitious plans for new-build.

On the political front, US president Joe Biden signed into law new legislation that will help to finance struggling nuclear reactors and could save dozens from being shut down early. In Europe, the nuclear industry celebrated when members of the European parliament decided to “follow the science” and support legislation which includes nuclear in the bloc’s sustainable finance taxonomy for green investment.

Date: Tuesday, 10 January 2023
Original article: nucnet.org/news/five-major-developments-that-are-setting-the-stage-for-2023-and-beyond-1-1-2023

In a wide ranging interview for the World Nuclear News podcast, Cameco CEO Tim Gitzel explained: Why the time was right for the Westinghouse deal How Russia's war with Ukraine has led to 'bifurcation' of the nuclear sector Explained Cameco's long-term strategy Looks ahead at the impact of new technologies, including SMRs How nuclear will need to play a key role in getting to net-zero

Date: Wednesday, 09 November 2022
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/In-Quotes-Cameco-s-Tim-Gitzel-WNN-podcast-on-nucle

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made the full case for nuclear to be deployed rapidly to enable the phase out of coal in a new Nuclear Energy for a Net Zero World brochure. The organisation is taking it to next month's COP26 climate change meeting to argue for evidence-based policy and "ramped up" investment in nuclear.

Date: Tuesday, 19 October 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-takes-the-case-for-nuclear-to-COP26

President says Europe ‘will never have’ enough renewable energy capacity Mr Macron said France’s nuclear plants are a major asset for producing clean hydrogen. Courtesy Elysée Palace. French president Emmanuel Macron said that by 2030 France must be a leader in carbon-free power production with one small modular reactor in operation and nuclear plants used to produce clean hydrogen through electrolysis.

Mr Macron said Europe will never have enough renewable energy capacity to produce sufficient green hydrogen and that France’s nuclear plants are a major asset for producing green hydrogen.

Mr Macron made the comments as he unveiled a five-year investment plan on Tuesday aimed at fostering industrial champions and innovation.

“We must wage the battle of innovation and industrialisation at the same time,” the French president told a gathering of business leaders and young entrepreneurs, unveiling plans to invest €30bn to “re-industrialise” the country.

Date: Wednesday, 13 October 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/macron-announces-plans-for-first-smr-and-green-hydrogen-from-nuclear-plants-by-2030-10-2-2021

After falling by about 1% in 2020 due to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, global electricity demand will increase by 5% in 2021 and 4% in 2022, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). However, almost half of this increase will be from fossil fuels - notably coal - threatening to push CO2 emissions from the power sector to record levels in 2022. Nuclear power generation is forecast to grow by around 1% in 2021 and by 2% in 2022.

Date: Friday, 16 July 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Emissions-set-to-rise-with-growth-in-coal-use,-say