Latest News

Filters

Filter by tags: Superconducting magnet Clear all tag filters

15 news articles found


The US National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) has called for urgent investment by the government and private sector to enable a pilot fusion plant to be operational in the 2035-2040 timeframe.

Date: Saturday, 13 March 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/US-could-operate-a-fusion-plant-by-2040-Academy-sa

General Atomics (GA) has completed the construction and testing of the first of seven superconducting magnet modules that will make up the Central Solenoid of the ITER international fusion machine. The module is part of the USA's largest contribution to the fusion project, and will be shipped to the ITER construction site in France later this year.

Date: Saturday, 06 February 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/First-ITER-solenoid-module-completed

US-based General Atomics (GA) has been awarded a contract by US ITER, based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to develop the manufacturing process for components for the system that will transmit microwave heating into the heart of the ITER international fusion reactor under construction at Cadarache in France.

Date: Wednesday, 11 November 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsgeneral-atomics-wins-iter-contract-8354329

US Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) leaders last week to mark progress toward a next-generation fusion materials project.

Date: Wednesday, 21 October 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsprogess-for-oakridge-mpex-fusion-project-8191161

The ITER group, in a ceremony on 28 July marked the start of the machine assembly of the international experimental tokamak nuclear fusion reactor under construction at Cadarache in France.

Date: Friday, 31 July 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsassembly-of-iter-begins-in-france-8053044

Plan is to generate first ultra-hot plasma at €20bn facility in 2025 The €20bn project will replicate the reactions that power the sun and is intended to demonstrate fusion power can be generated on a commercial scale. Photo courtesy Iter. The world’s largest nuclear fusion project began its five-year assembly phase on Tuesday in southern France, with the first ultra-hot plasma expected to be generated in late 2025.

The €20bn Iter (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project will replicate the reactions that power the sun and is intended to demonstrate fusion power can be generated on a commercial scale.

The steel and concrete superstructures nestled in the hills of southern France will house a 23,000-tonne machine, known as a tokamak, capable of creating what is essentially an earthbound star.

Millions of components will be used to assemble the giant reactor, which will weigh 23,000 tonnes and the project is the most complex engineering endeavour in history. Almost 3,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets, some heavier than a jumbo jet, will be connected by 200km of superconducting cables, all kept at -269C by the world’s largest cryogenic plant.

Date: Wednesday, 29 July 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/world-s-largest-nuclear-fusion-project-under-assembly-in-france-7-2-2020

Aim is to ‘supercharge’ country’s advanced nuclear energy industry A computer-generated image of Tokamak Energy’s ST40 small modular fusion reactor. Courtesy Tokamak Energy. The UK has announced £40m of funding to “unlock thousands of green jobs” by developing the next generation of nuclear energy technology, with £30m of the total going to support three small modular reactor projects.

The government said the £30m will speed up the development of three SMR projects in the UK and “drive them closer towards supplying low-carbon energy to the nation”.

The remaining £10m will be invested in smaller research, design, and manufacturing projects.

The government said the funding will ensure SMR technology is more attractive to private sector investors, “supercharging” the development of the industry and creating supply chains for future SMR developments.

Date: Tuesday, 14 July 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/uk-announces-gbp40-million-funding-for-reactor-projects-7-1-2020

The core of the superconducting magnet was manufactured at ASG in Italy. Photo courtesy ASG. The core of another superconducting magnet has been completed in Italy for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) under construction at Cadarache in southern France.

The massive component was constructed at the ASG Superconductors factory in La Spezia, northern Italy. It will now be delivered to the port of Marghera, near Venice, for shipment to France.

Date: Wednesday, 10 June 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/core-of-second-superconducting-magnet-completed-in-italy-6-2-2020

Europe and Japan have signed a joint declaration on fusion energy aimed at closer cooperation with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter).

Date: Friday, 06 March 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newseurope-and-japan-tighten-co-operation-on-fusion-7809951

Aim is to build foundations for reactors of the future, says Commission A 2019 file photo of the Iter site at Cadarache in southern France. Photo courtesy Iter. Europe and Japan have signed a joint declaration in the field of fusion energy that will see experts working more closely with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) to ensure that the €20bn project “moves forward as smoothly as possible”.

The European Commission said an updated “broader approach” declaration, first implemented in 2007, was signed in Brussels by energy commissioner Kadri Simson, representing the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom), and Kazuo Kodama, ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary of Japan to the European Union.

The Commission said the broader approach represents a highly successful collaboration between two major players in fusion research. It will also mean knowledge and expertise can be consolidated among the wider fusion community, creating “as solid a base as possible” on which to build the commercial fusion reactors of the future.

The signing of the updated declaration comes after Europe and Japan took stock of the progress made so far in fusion research and reaffirmed their commitment to continuing their joint activities.

Date: Wednesday, 04 March 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/europe-and-japan-reaffirm-commitment-to-collaboration-3-2-2020

Projects

Organisations

Status

No Tags found.