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The possibility of using nuclear fuel from suppliers other than Russia’s TVEL at the Paks NPP has been legally enshrined in Hungary’s legislation. Members of the national parliament supported an amendment to the nuclear energy strategy proposed by the government. State Secretary at the Ministry of Energy Attila Steiner noted that Paks, Hungary’s only NPP currently uses nuclear fuel supplied by Rosatom enterprises.

Date: Thursday, 30 November 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newshungary-authorises-use-of-diverse-nuclear-fuel-sources-11335610

The discharge of treated water from Japan's Fukushima Daiichi NPP is progressing as planned and without any technical concerns, the Task Force set up by the IAEA confirmed after its recent mission to review the safety of the discharge with reference to the international safety standards, two months after it began.

Date: Wednesday, 01 November 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-says-alps-treated-water-release-is-progressing-as-planned-11258466

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) experts have in recent days continued to inspect parts of Ukraine’s Zaporizhia NPP (ZNPP), without seeing any mines or explosives. They are still waiting to gain the necessary access to the rooftops of reactor units 3 & 4 following recent reports that explosives may have been placed there, Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi said, adding that the nuclear safety and security situation remains very precarious.

Date: Friday, 14 July 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsless-tension-at-znpp-as-iaea-site-searches-continue-11004913

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety review has concluded that Japan’s plans to release treated water stored at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (FDNPS) into the sea are consistent with IAEA safety standards. In a report formally presented by Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi to Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida during his recent visit to Tokyo the IAEA also said discharges of the treated water would have a negligible radiological impact on people or the environment.

Date: Saturday, 08 July 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-approves-japans-plans-to-release-treated-water-into-the-sea-at-fukushima-10990691

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi has said he hopes to "reinforce" the agency's team of experts at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant to reflect its expanded role which includes monitoring compliance with the five safety and security principles outlined at the United Nations last week.

Date: Tuesday, 06 June 2023
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-preparing-to-expand-team-at-Zaporizhzhia

The dependence of the Zaporizhia Nuclear Power Plant (ZNPP) on a single still functioning power line for the external electricity it needs poses a major risk to nuclear safety and security, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi said in his latest update. This comes amid signs of continued military activity in the region.

Date: Wednesday, 19 April 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsmilitary-activity-continues-near-zaporizhia-npp-10770020

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Rafael Mariano Grossi says that the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant's reliance on a single functioning external power line, and two landmine explosions near the plant, mean it is "more important than ever to agree" safety measures for the site. 

Date: Saturday, 15 April 2023
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Landmine-explosions-underline-need-for-Zaporizhzhi

Four potential locations across Estonia, which could accommodate a nuclear power plant, have been identified by a finance ministry analysis. 

Date: Friday, 14 April 2023
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsestonias-finance-ministry-identifies-four-possible-npp-sites-10756091

Advances in emerging field of ‘theranostics’ are a game-changer Millions of patients around the globe rely on the regular and timely production of diagnostic and therapeutic isotopes produced in research reactors and accelerator facilities. Image courtesy IAEA. Advances in medical isotope diagnostics and therapy are holding promise for cancer patients, despite challenges facing the nuclear medical field in recent years related to radionuclide production and supply, rising costs, and stricter regulation.

Medical isotopes are radioactive substances used in various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to treat various types of cancers and other conditions. They are essential for modern medicine, allowing physicians to visualise and target specific organs, tissues and cells in a patient’s body.

Over more than a decade, personalised medicine using nuclear techniques has been gaining pace, allowing doctors to tailor therapies and treatments to the specific needs and physiology of a patient, and to avoid harm to healthy organs or tissues.

According to Sven Van den Berghe, chief executive of Belgium-based isotope producer PanTera, one technique that has seen significant advances is known as theranostics – the term used to describe the combination of using one radioactive drug to diagnose and a second to deliver therapy to treat the main tumour and any metastatic tumours.

Date: Friday, 14 April 2023
Original article: nucnet.org/news/sector-aims-to-tackle-isotope-supply-problems-as-excitement-grows-over-targeted-therapies-4-4-2023