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The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) announced that the first canister of used nuclear fuel had been loaded into the Interim Storage Facilty 2 (ISF-2) at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

Date: Friday, 20 November 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfirst-canister-of-used-fuel-loaded-at-chernobyl-storage-facility-8369174

Milestone follows 20 years of work at the Ukraine site Courtesy EBRD. The first waste canister of spent nuclear fuel was loaded into the €400m ISF-2 interim storage facility at the Chernobyl nuclear power station site in Ukraine on Wednesday, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development announced.

The milestone represents the culmination of more than 20 years of work at the site, where spent nuclear fuel from reactors 1, 2 and 3 at the destroyed nuclear station will be processed and stored at ISF-2, the world’s largest nuclear dry storage facility.

ISF-2 has been constructed by an international consortium led by the US company Holtec and financed by the international community through the Nuclear Safety Account, managed by the EBRD.

The first loaded double-walled canister contains 93 spent fuel assemblies that have been removed from the site’s ageing storage facility, and processed and packaged in the new ISF-2 facility. In total, more than 21,000 spent fuel assemblies from Chernobyl reactors 1, 2 and 3 will make this journey over the next eight or more years. The ISF-2 is the largest dry spent fuel storage facility in the world and has a lifespan of a minimum of 100 years.

Hot testing at ISF-2 began earlier this year and the full licence to operate is expected in early 2021. “Important work remains to be completed to secure the full operating licence, but the successful testing and loading of the first full fuel load provides all those involved with cause for some celebration,” said Steven White, EBRD associate director, nuclear safety.

Date: Friday, 20 November 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/first-spent-nuclear-fuel-canister-loaded-in-isf-2-storage-facility-11-4-2020

The unloading of used nuclear fuel from Russian storage facilities at the former onshore technical base of the Navy in in Andreeva Bay near Murmansk is planned to be fully completed by 2027, state nuclear corporation Rosatom said on 6 August. The Andreeva Bay storage facility established in the 1960s, is the largest such facility in Northwest Russia and one of the biggest in the world. To date more than 30% of the fuel has been removed from Andreeva Bay and sent for processing. Nuclear waste management company RosRAO (part of Rosatom) began unloading spent nuclear fuel from the Andreeva Bay base in May 2017.

Date: Wednesday, 12 August 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsused-fuel-removal-from-russias-andreeva-bay-to-be-completed-by-2027-8073673

The Ministry of Energy of Uzbekistan has announced the development of a national Low-Carbon Energy Strategy with assistance from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), and international consulting company Corporate Solutions. Uzbekistan plans to develop alternative energy sources, including solar, hydro and wind, to produce electricity with low-carbon emissions. Uzbekistan also plans to build Central Asia’s first nuclear power plant, to provide the country with "uninterrupted and high-quality electricity on an industrial scale", the ministry said.

Date: Friday, 29 May 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Uzbekistan-unveils-low-carbon-energy-strategy

Used fuel assemblies, which had been lying for decades at the bottom of Building 5, an ageing used fuel store at Russia’s Andreeva Bay in the Arctic northwest, have been removed and secured. The complex operation that was the first of its kind, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) announced on 26 November.

Date: Friday, 29 November 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsmore-progress-in-andreeva-bay-clean-up-7531300

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has announced the retrieval of abandoned, highly radioactive used nuclear fuel assemblies from the bottom of Building 5 at Andreeva Bay in north-western Russian. Following the successful operation, radiation levels at the facility have fallen by over 40%, enabling further decommissioning work and removing "one of the most significant radiological risks to the Barent Sea region", the London-headquartered bank said.

Date: Thursday, 28 November 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/EBRD-announces-breakthrough-in-clean-up-of-Andreev

The keys for the New Safe Confinement (NSC) shielding unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant were symbolically presented to the Ukrainian authorities yesterday, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has announced.

Date: Thursday, 11 July 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Keys-to-Chernobyl-shielding-passed-to-Ukraine

The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has led international efforts to transform the site of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. Here, Balthasar Lindauer, director of the London-headquartered bank's Nuclear Safety Department, gives an insight into the change in safety culture at the plant.

Date: Monday, 10 June 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Viewpoint-Chernobyl-and-a-very-modern-safety-cultu

State Specialised Enterprise ChNPP said yesterday that the first 10 canisters for the dry interim fuel storage facility (ISF-2) had been delivered to the site of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. ISF2 is in the final construction stage under a contract Ukraine signed with US-based Holtec International in 2007. To be completed this year, it will be used to store all the used fuel on the site for at least 100 years.

Date: Friday, 27 November 2015
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Holtec-delivers-first-dry-storage-canisters-to-Che