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A surge in well-designed energy policies is needed to put the world on track for a resilient energy system that can meet climate goals, the International Energy Agency said today. Unveiling the latest edition of its flagship publication, the Paris-based organisation noted that worldwide low-carbon electricity generation from nuclear and renewable energies had exceeded coal-fired generation for the first time last year.

Date: Wednesday, 14 October 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IEA-report-highlights-need-for-new-momentum-behind

Plan is to generate first ultra-hot plasma at €20bn facility in 2025 The €20bn project will replicate the reactions that power the sun and is intended to demonstrate fusion power can be generated on a commercial scale. Photo courtesy Iter. The world’s largest nuclear fusion project began its five-year assembly phase on Tuesday in southern France, with the first ultra-hot plasma expected to be generated in late 2025.

The €20bn Iter (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project will replicate the reactions that power the sun and is intended to demonstrate fusion power can be generated on a commercial scale.

The steel and concrete superstructures nestled in the hills of southern France will house a 23,000-tonne machine, known as a tokamak, capable of creating what is essentially an earthbound star.

Millions of components will be used to assemble the giant reactor, which will weigh 23,000 tonnes and the project is the most complex engineering endeavour in history. Almost 3,000 tonnes of superconducting magnets, some heavier than a jumbo jet, will be connected by 200km of superconducting cables, all kept at -269C by the world’s largest cryogenic plant.

Date: Wednesday, 29 July 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/world-s-largest-nuclear-fusion-project-under-assembly-in-france-7-2-2020

The impetus for new build is being spurred by a need to reduce reliance on polluting coal China has 10 nuclear units under construction including two Generation III Hualong One plants at Fangchenggang. China, with its state nuclear companies backed by a government hungry for development, is the most active nation for building new nuclear power plants. That trend that is likely to continue, although confirming lucrative export deals for its reactor technology still runs far behind the pace set by Russia, which says it had 39 reactors under construction or planned overseas as of 2018.

This compares to only two reactors under construction overseas by China, both in Pakistan, although in the UK China has a stake in EDF’s Hinkley Point C project and plans for Chinese technology at Bradwell B. At Sizewell C in Suffolk EDF wants to build a clone of Hinkley Point C if it can attract enough private investment. CGN holds a 20% share.

The government has said it wants to build 30 reactors overseas by 2030. China and Russia both see Africa, where about 600 million people live without electricity, as something of a golden fleece and are pursuing nuclear agreements, which lay the groundwork for new-build, in a number of African nations. Small modular reactors and floating reactors could be an option for isolated areas. China has already said it is close to starting work on its first floating unit, but reliable details are few and far between.

The impetus for nuclear power in China is increasingly due to air pollution from coal-fired plants. To meet its climate goal as stipulated in the Paris agreement, China will need to reduce its coal power capacity by 40% over the next decade, according to Global Energy Monitor’s analysis. At present, this seems unrealistic. In addition to roughly 1,000 GW of existing coal capacity, China has 121 GW of coal plants under construction, which is more than is being built in the rest of the world combined.

Date: Friday, 24 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/china-keen-to-match-pace-set-by-russia-in-overseas-construction-1-4-2020

The United Nations, the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the World Energy Council (WEC) are drawing global attention to the inherent qualities of nuclear power as a clean and reliable source of electricity. Now into its seventh decade, nuclear energy is seen by these and other prominent organisations as an existing and proven solution to the 21st Century challenges of climate change and a sustainable energy transition.

Date: Friday, 06 September 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Nuclear-power-is-the-silent-giant-being-invited-fi

As a result of higher energy consumption, CO2 emissions rose 1.7% last year and hit a new record, according to the latest data from the International Energy Agency (IEA). The Paris-based agency’s Global Energy & CO2 Status Report, released today, shows that the global energy system emitted 33 billion tonnes of CO2 in 2018.

Date: Tuesday, 26 March 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IEA-demands-increase-in-clean-energy-as-emissions

The US administration on 2 November announced the reimposition of all US sanctions on Iran that had been lifted under the July 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). This is the second raft of penalties reimposed since President Donald Trump withdrew from JCPOA in May, and they cover Iran's shipping, financial and energy sectors. The sanctions that come into force on 5 November penalise countries that do not stop importing Iranian oil and foreign companies that do business with blacklisted Iranian entities, including the central bank, a number of private financial institutions and state-run port and shipping companies. Eight countries, identified by officials as US allies, will receive temporary waivers allowing them to continue to import Iranian petroleum products for a limited period. Pompeo did not identify the countries to be granted the waivers. But according to numerous reports, these include India, South Korea, Turkey, Japan and Italy.

Date: Monday, 05 November 2018
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsusa-ramps-up-sanctions-on-iran-6835977

The results of a four-year International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on improving system and safety analysis of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs) are now available. The recently published IAEA TECDOC, Benchmark Analysis of EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Tests, is a result of work done by experts from 19 organisations in 11 member states.

Date: Tuesday, 12 September 2017
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-concludes-research-project-on-fast-reactor-safety-5924019

Japan’s Toshiba Corp’s US nuclear subsidiary, Westinghouse Electric, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in New York court. Westinghouse listed $10bn each in assets and liabilities in its filing in US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York.

Date: Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newswestinghouse-files-for-bankruptcy-5773901

Japan’s Toshiba, facing large cost overruns on flagship projects and continuing fallout from a financial scandal, delayed publication of its financial results for a second time on 14 March and said it would consider selling its controlling stake in  it’s Westinghouse US subsidiary. Toshiba also suggested  that Westinghouse could file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Acknowledging its worst ever financial crisis, Toshiba announced a three-year growth plan including  proposals to improve its management.

Date: Wednesday, 15 March 2017
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newstoshiba-considers-sale-of-westinghouse-5763859