Latest News

Filters

Filter by tags: United Kingdom Japan Clear all tag filters

62 news articles found


The main challenges facing the nuclear industry are not in the production and delivery of electricity, but in securing the policy support required for it to expand its contribution of sustainable and low-carbon energy. This was the message of Philippe Costes, senior advisor at World Nuclear Assocation, to delegates at the Nuclear Power Plants Expo & Summit in Istanbul this week.

Date: Friday, 06 March 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Speech-Policy-support-for-nuclear-in-the-global-en

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) team said on 21 January that Japan had strengthened inspections as part of extensive efforts in recent years to improve its regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety. Following an eight-day review, the experts noted that significant progress had been made since a previous IAEA mission in 2016 and also identified some areas for further improvement, recommending measures on occupational radiation protection and transport safety.

Date: Saturday, 25 January 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-mission-sees-strengthened-safety-inspections-in-japan-7653742

The impetus for new build is being spurred by a need to reduce reliance on polluting coal China has 10 nuclear units under construction including two Generation III Hualong One plants at Fangchenggang. China, with its state nuclear companies backed by a government hungry for development, is the most active nation for building new nuclear power plants. That trend that is likely to continue, although confirming lucrative export deals for its reactor technology still runs far behind the pace set by Russia, which says it had 39 reactors under construction or planned overseas as of 2018.

This compares to only two reactors under construction overseas by China, both in Pakistan, although in the UK China has a stake in EDF’s Hinkley Point C project and plans for Chinese technology at Bradwell B. At Sizewell C in Suffolk EDF wants to build a clone of Hinkley Point C if it can attract enough private investment. CGN holds a 20% share.

The government has said it wants to build 30 reactors overseas by 2030. China and Russia both see Africa, where about 600 million people live without electricity, as something of a golden fleece and are pursuing nuclear agreements, which lay the groundwork for new-build, in a number of African nations. Small modular reactors and floating reactors could be an option for isolated areas. China has already said it is close to starting work on its first floating unit, but reliable details are few and far between.

The impetus for nuclear power in China is increasingly due to air pollution from coal-fired plants. To meet its climate goal as stipulated in the Paris agreement, China will need to reduce its coal power capacity by 40% over the next decade, according to Global Energy Monitor’s analysis. At present, this seems unrealistic. In addition to roughly 1,000 GW of existing coal capacity, China has 121 GW of coal plants under construction, which is more than is being built in the rest of the world combined.

Date: Friday, 24 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/china-keen-to-match-pace-set-by-russia-in-overseas-construction-1-4-2020

The Bill Gates-backed company is developing two Generation IV reactor designs, but is also carrying out research into materials testing and radioisotope production A computer generated mockup of the TerraPower Travelling Wave Reactor. Courtesy TerraPower. In just a few years TerraPower – the US nuclear company backed by Bill Gates – has transformed itself from developing a single advanced reactor design to becoming a hub of innovation in a number of key areas of nuclear science.

It has added to its portfolio projects to manufacture medical isotopes, develop process heat applications and deploy modelling software for use in designing advanced nuclear reactors.

In addition to its work on the Travelling Wave Reactor (TWR), the company has also begun, in cooperation with multiple US partners, to develop a molten chloride salt reactor (MCFR).

The TWR is designed to be capable of using fuel made from depleted uranium, which is currently a waste byproduct of the uranium enrichment process.

Date: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/if-we-don-t-innovate-in-nuclear-other-countries-will-12-2-2019

Public perception of nuclear power in mitigating climate change does not depend exclusively on education, but is also determined to a large extent by each individual's world view, Jessica Lovering of the Breakthrough Institute said last week at the International Conference on Climate Change and the Role of Nuclear Power, held by the International Atomic Energy Agency at its headquarters in Vienna.

Date: Saturday, 19 October 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/How-world-view-affects-public-perception-of-nuclea

Half of the carbon emissions in the world today were produced in the last 30 years and it is up to governments and industry to cooperate as never before to ensure the next three decades lead to a clean energy future. This was the consensus of a debate on multilateral partnerships that took place yesterday at the International Conference on Climate Change and the Role of Nuclear Power at the International Atomic Energy Agency's headquarters in Vienna.

Date: Saturday, 12 October 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/A-low-carbon-future-needs-partnerships

Policymakers need to understand that the system costs of variable renewable energy (VRE) necessitate the inclusion of nuclear and hydro as the primary dispatchable low-carbon generation options within a clean electricity mix. Representatives of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) told delegates at World Nuclear Association Symposium 2019 in London last week that the issue of system costs was no longer a novelty, but an increasingly important topic in the fight against climate change.

Date: Monday, 09 September 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/System-costs-prove-need-for-nuclear-in-clean-power

The United Nations, the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the World Energy Council (WEC) are drawing global attention to the inherent qualities of nuclear power as a clean and reliable source of electricity. Now into its seventh decade, nuclear energy is seen by these and other prominent organisations as an existing and proven solution to the 21st Century challenges of climate change and a sustainable energy transition.

Date: Friday, 06 September 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Nuclear-power-is-the-silent-giant-being-invited-fi

Boris Johnson expressed his "passionate" support for nuclear power when he addressed the House of Commons for the first time as UK prime minister yesterday. Seven of the country’s eight existing nuclear plants are set to be retired by 2030, while new-build projects have faced financial uncertainty over the last two years.

Date: Friday, 26 July 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/UKs-new-premier-promises-boost-for-nuclear-power