Latest News

Filters

Filter by tags: Netherlands Sweden Clear all tag filters

17 news articles found


Declaration signed at virtual conference calls for reactor deployment in Europe by 2030s Fermi Energia chief executive Kalev Kallemets (above left) told the conference the commpany aims to apply to the government to start the planning process for an SMR in late 2021. Estonian company Fermi Energia is raising capital to start the official planning process for new generation small modular reactor units and has signed a declaration with eight other firms and organisations calling for deployment in Europe by the 2030s.

The declaration calls for “a pragmatic approach” to SMR licensing to overcome licensing and regulatory challenges and reduce SMR project risk relating to nuclear regulation and the licensing process. It says SMR design standardisation must be facilitated “to the greatest extent possible”.

“In developing or updating the regulatory framework applicable to SMRs, host country nuclear regulatory bodies should seek to facilitate regulatory harmonisation,” the declaration says. “Regulatory frameworks should be based on International Atomic Energy Agency safety standards and European Union nuclear safety directives should be implemented.”

SMR host countries should also consider compatibility with relevant vendor and reference plants.

The declaration was signed during a virtual conference on SMR deployment in Estonia by Fermi Energia, Finland’s Fortum, Tractabel of Sweden, Vattenfall of Belgium, Synthos of Poland, the Czech Republic CEZ Group, Nuclearelectrica of Romania, the e-Lise Foundation of the Netherlands and the 18for0 lobby group from Ireland.

Date: Thursday, 11 February 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/fermi-energia-raising-capital-to-begin-smr-licensing-process-2-3-2021

Estonia needs to put in place the necessary legislation and competencies if a small modular reactor (SMR) is to be in operation by 2035, speakers at a conference organised by Fermi Energia agreed yesterday. The Baltic country aims to stop generating electricity from oil shale by 2035, but has yet to officially launch a nuclear programme.

Date: Thursday, 11 February 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/No-time-to-waste-in-Estonian-SMR-deployment-confer

Project on schedule for completion in 2028 The shut-down Ignalina nuclear power station in Lithuania. Courtesy EBRD. Workers carrying out decommissioning a the Ignalina nuclear power station in Lithuania removed more than 4,200 tonnes of equipment and 3,500 tonnes of concrete waste in 2020, with more than 7,400 tonnes of radioactive waste processed.

INPP, the company operating the station, said that since decommissioning began in 2010, almost 64,0000 tonnes of equipment and concrete waste have been dismantled. By the end of decommissioning in 2038, a further 108,000 tonnes of equipment will need to be dismantled.

In 2020, extensive dismantling work was carried out in the turbine hall of Unit 2, where 97% of the equipment was dismantled. Most of the equipment, after checking for contamination, is sold at auctions as scrap metal, while the rest is temporarily stored until it can be sent for permanent storage in repositories.

Ignalina’s two Soviet-era RBMK units were shut down permanently in 2004 and 2009 in line with requirements for Lithuania’s membership of the EU.

Date: Tuesday, 19 January 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/lithuania-ignalina-announces-significant-progress-with-decommissioning-in-2020-1-1-2021

The slightly elevated levels of three different radioisotopes recently detected in northern Europe are probably related to a nuclear reactor which is either operating or undergoing maintenance, the International Atomic Energy Agency said in a statement on 3 July.

The recorded air concentrations of the particles were very low and posed no risk to human health and the environment, the statement said.

However, the IAEA also said the geographical origin of the release has not yet been determined.

Last week, Estonia, Finland and Sweden reported levels of ruthenium-103, caesium-134 and caesium-137 isotopes in the air which were higher than usual.

The IAEA, in an effort to help identify the possible origin of the radioisotopes, contacted counterparts in Europe and asked for information about whether they were detected in their countries, and if any event there may have been associated with the atmospheric release.

Date: Saturday, 04 July 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/elevated-radioisotope-levels-in-nordic-region-likely-linked-to-nuclear-reactor-7-5-2020

Swedish state utility Vattenfall has reported that 2013 was the second-best year of nuclear generation since it started, performance which CEO Øystein Løseth said could be credited in large part to recent years' modernisation work. Its seven Swedish reactors at Forsmark and Ringhals generated 51.9 TWh in 2013.

Date: Tuesday, 25 March 2014
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsvattenfall-reports-a-good-year-for-nuclear-4203241

Nuclear vendor AREVA's full-year 2013 free cash flow broke even for the first time since 2005, but three big nuclear power projects -- including most prominently Olkiluoto 3 -- continued to drag down the company's financial results, it said.

Date: Thursday, 27 February 2014
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsol3-continues-to-punish-areva-full-year-results-4186458

The events at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station in Japan have already impacted nuclear policies worldwide. Germany has shut down its oldest nuclear plants for a safety review. China and Switzerland have suspended the approval processes to build new reactors and safety reviews have been ordered in many countries.

Date: Friday, 18 March 2011
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsinternational-impact-of-fukushima-daiichi-emergency