Latest News

Filters

Filter by tags: ITER Clear all tag filters

150 news articles found


Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd (MHI) said it has been awarded a first contract from Japan’s National Institutes for Quantum Science and Technology (QST) for manufacture of six units of divertor outer vertical target additional components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under construction in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance in southern France.

Date: Wednesday, 22 December 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsmhi-awarded-iter-contract-9330000

UK-based engineering company Assystem said on 4 November that it had been awarded two contracts by the UK Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) to support the development of STEP (Spherical Tokamak for Energy Production), the UK’s prototype fusion power plant that will demonstrate the commercial viability of fusion energy. 

Date: Tuesday, 09 November 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsassystem-wins-two-contracts-for-new-uk-step-fusion-plant-9224735

New report highlights current opportunities for progress in commercialisation of the technology The UK has shortlisted five sites as the potential future home of the country’s first prototype fusion energy plant. Courtesy UKAEA. Capital costs for the development of a new generation of nuclear fusion reactors are high at around £100/MWh, but a substantial programme of standard build could bring them down to a viable target of £60-£70/MWh, a report published by engineering group Assystem says.

According to the report, which examines the potential for fusion in the UK, the government has estimated the 2040 levelised costs of electricity (LCOE) for the UK for standalone offshore wind, onshore wind and large-scale solar of £40/MWh, £44/MWh and £33/MWh respectively.

The £60-£70/MWh cost for fusion “provides the first target for nuclear fusion to be economically competitive”, the report concludes. It says fusion is uncompetitive today with other low-carbon options available in the UK – including wind and light-water nuclear fission reactors. The reason for this is the combination of a relatively high construction cost (£5,887/kWe) and a low capacity factor (56%).

The International Energy Agency has put the LCOE for advanced nuclear at $63/MWh (about £45/MWh).

With an improved, large fusion design the construction cost decreases to £4,135/kWe and the capacity factor to 75%. These two effects improve the fusion economics, decreasing the LCOE into the range £60 to £97/MWh. For a small fusion design, the energy cost of 75 units is in the region of £69- £99/MWh – a range that is comparable to 10 units of large fusion reactors and also the energy cost of LWR fission reactors.

Date: Saturday, 23 October 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/capital-costs-are-high-but-can-be-reduced-to-economically-competitive-level-10-4-2021

US-based General Atomics (GA) on10 August marked the completion and shipment of the first Central Solenoid module for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under construction in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance in southern France, with a celebration at the firm’s Magnet Technologies Centre (MTC) in California. The module recently arrived in France after being shipped from the MTC in late June and is scheduled to reach the ITER site in the coming weeks. Five additional modules, plus one spare, are at various stages of fabrication, with the second module expected to ship this month. The Central Solenoid will be assembled as the modules arrive on site and is scheduled to be fully installed in 2023-24. ITER is scheduled to begin its first plasma operations in 2025.

Date: Wednesday, 18 August 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsgeneral-atomics-marks-completion-of-first-central-solenoid-module-for-iter-9005140

US-based Jacobs said on 10 August that it had been selected to design and deliver the First Plasma Radiological Environmental Monitoring System (REMS), a key safety system for The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under construction in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance in southern France.

Date: Friday, 13 August 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsjacobs-to-supply-first-plasma-radiological-environmental-monitoring-system-for-iter-8991261

The European Commission (EC) on 2 July adopted the Euratom Work Programme 2021-2022, implementing the Euratom Research and Training Programme 2021-2025. The Work Programme outlines the objectives and specific topic areas, which will receive €300 million in funding. These investments will support fusion research, and help to foster progress in a wide range of areas, from further improving nuclear safety and radiation protection, to boosting non-power applications of nuclear technology. The Work Programme contributes to the EU's efforts to further develop technological leadership and promote excellence in nuclear research and innovation. This year’s calls have a particular focus on the medical field, directly supporting the priorities of the EU’s Beating Cancer Action Plan and the SAMIRA Action Plan.

Date: Friday, 09 July 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newseuratom-programme-receives-300-million-for-fusion-research-8879362

At its 28th Meeting on 16-17 June, the ITER Council convened via remote video conference to assess the latest progress reports and performance metrics of the ITER Project. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under construction in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance in southern France is a first-of-a-kind global collaboration. Construction of ITER is funded mainly by the European Union (45.6%) with the remainder shared equally by China, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the USA (9.1% each). However, in practice, the members deliver little monetary contribution to the project, instead providing ‘in-kind’ contributions of components, systems or buildings.

Date: Wednesday, 23 June 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiter-reports-on-progress-8840244

The European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland has completed acceptance testing of Russian-made niobium-tin superconductors manufactured under the framework of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) CERN Conductor Development Programme, Rosatom’s Fuel Company TVEL said on 16 June. The design of the superconducting strands and the technology for their manufacture were developed at the AA Bochvar Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) in Moscow, while the 50km long qualification batch of strands was manufactured at the Chepetsky Mechanical Plant (CMP) in Glazov, Udmurt Republic (both part of TVEL). The work was completed as part of the agreement between TVEL and CERN, and was based on successful test results.

Date: Friday, 18 June 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newstvel-supplies-superconductors-to-cern-8827652

After a decade of design and fabrication, US-based General Atomics said on 15 June that it is ready to ship the first module of the Central Solenoid to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under construction in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance in southern France. Despite the challenges of Covid-19, ITER is almost 75% built and massive first-of-a-kind components have been arriving in France from three continents over the past 15 months. Construction of ITER is funded mainly by the European Union (45.6%) with the remainder shared equally by China, India, Japan, Korea, Russia and the USA (9.1% each). However, in practice, the members deliver little monetary contribution to the project, instead providing ‘in-kind’ contributions of components, systems or buildings.

Date: Wednesday, 16 June 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsgeneral-atomics-prepares-to-ship-first-module-of-iters-central-solenoid-8822680

Japan’s Toshiba Energy Systems & Solutions (Toshiba ESS) announced on 8 June that it had manufactured the first of four toroidal field coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) under construction in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance in southern France. Under a contract concluded in May 2014 with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Toshiba ESS is manufacturing four toroidal field coils, and six coil cases. The first coil case was completed in December 2018. Toshiba said the coil is one of the largest in the world - 16.5 metres in height, 9 metres in width, with a gross weight of approximately 300 tons. The toroidal field coils are huge superconducting magnets, that will generate the magnetic cage to contain the ITER fusion reactor's plasma. The reactor is scheduled to achieve first plasma in 2025.

Date: Friday, 11 June 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newstoshiba-manufactures-toroidal-field-coils-for-iter-8810860