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The pandemic has shown the resilience of the nuclear industry to act responsibly, both as a supplier of energy and as an employer, the head of the world's biggest uranium producer said today. In his address to delegates at the World Nuclear Fuel Cycle forum, Kazatomprom CEO Galymzhan Pirmatov said the wellbeing of the company's 20,000 employees was his first priority.

Date: Thursday, 15 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Kazatomprom-put-health-before-profit-during-pandem

Canada’s Cameco and Orano Canada on 9 April both announced plans to resume uranium production. Cameco said that it plans to restart production at its Cigar Lake uranium mine located in northern Saskatchewan. Production at Cigar Lake was temporarily suspended in December 2020 due to increasing risks posed by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. At that time, the availability of workers in critical areas was shrinking due to the pandemic, with more individuals screening out or residing in communities with pandemic-related travel restrictions.

Date: Wednesday, 14 April 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsuranium-production-to-resume-in-canada-8665738

Canadian uranium producer Cameco is "bullish about the future" thanks to growing interest from around the world in nuclear energy as a reliable, sustainable and low-carbon source of electricity, President and CEO Tim Gitzel said today during the World Nuclear Fuel Cycle forum, which is being held this week by the US Nuclear Energy Institute and World Nuclear Association.

Date: Wednesday, 14 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Cameco-buoyed-by-global-interest-in-nuclear

Company says it has financial capacity to handle disruptions The Cigar Lake facility in northern Saskatchewan. Image courtesy Cameco. Canada-based uranium miner Cameco is planning to restart production at its Cigar Lake uranium mine in northern Saskatchewan in April, the company said in a statement on Friday.

Cameco suspended operations at Cigar Lake in mid-December 2020 because of the increasing risks posed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The company said at the time that the availability of workers in critical areas was shrinking, with more individuals screening out or living in communities with pandemic-related travel restrictions.

With the restart of Cigar Lake, Cameco will closely monitor the Covid-19 case counts and the progress of the vaccine rollout, and will continue dialogue with public health authorities and northern Saskatchewan leaders.

Date: Tuesday, 13 April 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/cameco-to-restart-cigar-lake-mine-after-december-pandemic-shutdown-4-1-2021

Cameco has announced plans to restart production later this month at its Cigar Lake uranium mine in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, which was suspended in December last year in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, Orano Canada said it will resume production at its McClean Lake uranium mill, where ore from Cigar Lake is processed.

Date: Tuesday, 13 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Canadian-uranium-mine-and-mill-to-resume-operation

Energy and climate leaders from more than 40 countries took part in the IEA-COP26 Net Zero Summit on 31 March to discuss how to work together to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and meet the goals of the Paris Agreement. The Net Zero Summit, co-hosted by IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol and COP26 President Alok Sharma, brought together representatives of energy and climate ministries as well as participants from private companies, government institutions and NGOs.

Date: Wednesday, 07 April 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiea-lists-seven-principles-to-achieve-net-zero-8649950

The International Energy Agency (IEA) has published Seven Key Principles for Implementing Net Zero to ensure "dramatic acceleration of progress towards clean growth and resilience". The document, which has so far been welcomed by 20 countries, was published following the IEA-COP26 Net Zero Summit yesterday.

Date: Friday, 02 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IEA-unveils-7-key-principles-for-net-zero

The Covid-19 pandemic and recent controversies over vaccines have shown the need to keep critical knowledge, capabilities, technologies and infrastructure - including that related to nuclear energy - inside the European Union, an alliance of non-governmental organisations said in a letter to European commission president Ursula von der Leyen.

The Brussels-based weCare alliance, which includes NGOs promoting a technology neutral and very low-carbon energy mix to reduce CO2 emissions and limit climate change, said nuclear energy is a geopolitical challenge, for the European Union and needs to be supported and developed, as is done in many other parts of the world, if a clean, affordable and reliable energy mix for a sustainable European society is to be delivered.

The Covid-19 vaccine crisis highlights the importance for the European Union to have a reliable indigenous supply of energy for the common good. Since the energy must be very low-carbon, nuclear energy is key, the letter said.

Date: Thursday, 01 April 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/ngo-alliance-calls-for-nuclear-knowledge-and-technology-to-be-kept-inside-eu-3-3-2021

Following the announcement earlier in March that US-based Lightbridge Corporation and France’s Framatome ghad agreed to terminate their Enfission joint venture, Lightbridge on 24 March announced their financial results for the fiscal year ended 31 December 2020 and provided an update on the company's progress.

Date: Tuesday, 30 March 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newslightbridge-and-framatome-go-their-separate-ways-8633278

Three Baltic states and the EU itself have expressed concerns about safety at the Russia-backed project Image courtesy Creative Commons / Flickr / Mr.TinDC. Lithuania does not see a problem with Poland’s proposed nuclear power programme, but has concerns about the Russia-supplied Belarusian nuclear power station under construction near its border in Ostrovets, Lithuanian energy minister Dainius Kreivys told Polish energy portal Biznes Alert.

Mr Kreivys said in the interview: “The Polish nuclear project, which is being developed under European Union regulations, cannot be compared with the Russian project in Belarus, which raises growing concerns.”

He said Lithuania was not consulted over the deployment of the two-unit Belarusian nuclear station and it is in violation of the Espoo Convention, which requires trans-border consultation on nuclear facilities.

Mr Kreivys raised questions about the independent status of the Belarusian nuclear regulator and said that the Belarusian station had failed 27 stress tests with only a handful of issues having been addressed.

Date: Thursday, 25 March 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/energy-minister-says-belarusian-nuclear-project-raises-growing-concerns-3-3-2021