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Photo courtesy Google. NucNet and the Swiss Nuclear Forum (Nuklearforum Schweiz) have launched an upgraded version of their Nuclearplanet world nuclear map, an interactive world map showing all civil nuclear power plants and radioactive waste repositories with key information on each site.

Nuclearplanet was developed by the Swiss Nuclear Forum and is hosted on their website, but can be accessed via NucNet’s website. It is available in English, French and German.

Nuclearplanet is maintained and updated by the Swiss Nuclear Forum in cooperation with NucNet based on data taken from the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) and other primary sources.

Date: Wednesday, 25 March 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/nucnet-and-swiss-forum-launch-interactive-world-nuclear-map-3-2-2020

The Ignalina nuclear power station in Lithuania. Photo courtesy EBRD. The decommissioning of the Ignalina nuclear power station in Lithuania is “well advanced” and has reached a new milestone with the delivery of the final storage cask for spent nuclear fuel, one year ahead of schedule, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development confiremd today.

Germany-based GNS (Gesellschaft für Nuklear-Service) said last week it had delivered the final cask. The casks are used for the storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies that date from the time when the facility’s two Russian 1,185-MW RBMK units were operational.

Lithuania closed the first unit at Ignalina in 2004 and the second in 2009 following safety concerns about its Soviet-designed reactors. The EBRD is managing the Ignalina International Decommissioning Support Fund, established in 2001.

The EBRD said today that the decommissioning process is well advanced. An interim storage facility for spent fuel opened in October 2016 and has since received a total of 142 Constor RBMK 1500-M2 casks loaded with 12,891 spent fuel assemblies from the Ignalina reactors and storage ponds of Units 1 and 2.

Date: Tuesday, 03 March 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/decommissioning-of-soviet-era-reactors-well-advanced-says-ebrd-3-1-2020

International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Director Fatih Birol on 12 February told the Agency’s Big Ideas speaker series that a "grand coalition" of all stakeholders is needed to address the challenge of climate change, including the energy sector, which it accounts for most of the world's carbon dioxide emissions.

Date: Saturday, 15 February 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiea-stresses-need-to-combat-climate-change-7773146

Agency 2019 data shows coal still strong in Asia, but on retreat in advanced economies IEA director Fatih Birol speaking at the IEA Ministerial Meeting; Paris, November 2017. Photo courtesy Andrew Wheeler/IEA. Newly released data by the International Energy Agency (IEA) has shown that global CO2 emissions from energy generation flattened in 2019 at about 33 gigatonnes (Gt) mainly thanks to gains in advanced economies* because of the expanding role of renewable sources, a fuel transition from coal to natural gas, and higher nuclear power output.

The IEA said CO2 emissions remained unchanged from their 2018 levels, although the global economy expanded by 2.9%. The data shows that emissions remained largely stable between 2013 and 2016 and then experienced two years of consecutive growth in 2017 and 2018. An IEA chart showing CO2 emissions since 1990 (orange for advanced economies, yellow of rest of the world). Image courtesy IEA.

According to the IEA, increased nuclear power generation in advanced economies, particularly in Japan and South Korea, avoided the release of over 50 megatonnes (Mt) of CO2 in 2019.

Date: Thursday, 13 February 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/iea-report-says-global-co2-emissions-remained-stable-in-2019-2-3-2020

New-build projects are making progress, but governments are still struggling with finding the right financing package for large reactors The delayed Flamanville-3 is one of three EPR units under construction in Europe. The others are at Olkiluoto in Finland and Hinkley Point in the UK. Photo courtesy EDF. Western Europe

The UK is facing a major challenge to replace its aging fleet of Generation I nuclear power plants, many of which are scheduled to shut down in 2023.

The project by French state utility EDF to build two Generation III EPR units at Hinkley Point C in Somerset is on track for connection to the grid by 2025. Once in commercial operation the two units will provide up to 7% of the total electricity demand. Two similar units are planned for the Sizewell site in Suffolk.

However, press reports have suggested EDF is in “a race against time” to secure a funding deal for Sizewell C as delays risk making the project prohibitively expensive.

According to The Times newspaper EDF has hired Rothschild as financial adviser for the project and says it wants a “definitive way forward” from the government this year so it can start construction in 2022.

Date: Friday, 17 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/what-lies-in-store-in-2020-1-4-2020

Industry group and IEA have warned of supply problems as reactors are shut down The Mühleberg nuclear power station in Switzerland. Photo courtesyy BKW. The single-unit Mühleberg nuclear power plant in Switzerland ended generation after 47 years in operation on 20 December 2019, utility BKW confirmed.

The company said work on dismantling the 373-MW boiling water reactor unit will begin on 6 January 2020. It will be the first decommissioning of a commercial power reactor in Switzerland.

Since its commissioning on 6 November 1972, the plant has generated about 130 billion kW hours of electricity, which would cover the current consumption of a city such as Bern for more than 100 years.

Plant availability of more than 90% has enabled this, through continual investment by BKW in retrofitting and plant safety, BKW said. “This means that Mühleberg faces deactivation at its highest technological peak.”

The company said financing for the decommissioning and disposal of radioactive waste is in place. BKW will cover the costs, estimated at about 3 billion Swiss francs (€2.7bn, $3bn), in their entirety.

Date: Saturday, 28 December 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/nuclear-phaseout-begins-with-closure-of-muehleberg-12-5-2019

Climate scientist James E Hansen and others have written to the Financial Times, making the case for the inclusion of nuclear power in the EU Sustainable Finance Taxonomy. The text of the letter, published yesterday, and the list of signatories to it, follows.

Date: Wednesday, 18 December 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Viewpoint-EU-must-include-nuclear-power-in-its-lis

The nuclear industry took part in the UN climate talks this week at a time when the subject is no longer merely climate change, but climate emergency. At a side-event organised by Nuclear for Climate, panellists described how nuclear power is an essential part of the global response to that emergency.

Date: Saturday, 07 December 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Nuclear-for-Climate-speaks-at-COP-25