Latest News

Filters

Filter by tags: Parasitism Clear all tag filters

2 news articles found


Aim is to give states access to nuclear or nuclear-derived techniques IAEA director-general Rafael Mariano Grossi. Image courtesy IAEA/D. Calma. The International Atomic Energy Agency is launching a project to establish a global network of diagnostic laboratories that can conduct monitoring, surveillance, early detection and control of emerging and reemerging zoonotic diseases such as the Covid-19 coronavirus using nuclear or nuclear-derived techniques. 

The agency’s director-general, Rafael Mariano Grossi, told a virtual board of governors meeting on Monday that the Zoonotic Disease Integrated Action (Zodiac) project will give member states access to equipment, technology packages, expertise, guidance and training.

The aim is to make the world better prepared for future outbreaks. Mr Grossi said Covid-19 had exposed problems related to virus detection capabilities in many countries, as well as a need for better communication between health institutions around the world.

Date: Tuesday, 16 June 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/iaea-launches-zodiac-project-to-establish-global-laboratory-network-6-1-2020

A nuclear technique has successfully reduced the tsetse fly population in Senegal without harming other insects, an eight-year study has found. The study was supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), together with the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation. The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an insect birth control method that uses radiation to sterilise male flies.

Date: Wednesday, 15 January 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Radiation-used-to-control-tsetse-fly-numbers-in-Se

Countries

Status

No Tags found.