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Installation of the second tier of the reactor building's internal containment has been completed at unit 1 of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant under construction in Turkey.

Date: Tuesday, 07 July 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newssecond-tier-of-internal-containment-completed-at-akkuyu-1-8011807

Russian state nuclear corporation Rosatom has agreed to cooperate with the France’s Framatome and US General Electric Steam Power in the process to select a strategic investor for the Belene NPP project in Bulgaria.

Date: Monday, 22 June 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsrosatom-framatome-and-ge-agree-to-cooperate-on-belene-project-7985720

Government appears to favour ‘Boot’ model alread used by Russia Koeberg, near Cape Town, is the only commercial nuclear power station in South Africa. The Nuclear Industry Association of South Africa (Niasa) has proposed six possible funding options for new nuclear, but government officials have suggested the most likely is a “build, own, operate and transfer” (Boot) model similar to that used by Russia for project including Akkuyu in Turkey.

Niasa told Engineering News that the very high proportion of the cost of energy that comes from the repayment of capital means interest rates will be fundamental to the viability of any new nuclear project in South Africa.

The association said real interest rates – which are adjusted for inflation – on state debt could be in the range of 2% to 3%, while real interest rates on high risk equity finance could vary from 10% to 15%. It said this explains why some new nuclear projects such as state-supported projects in China could be very competitive while others, such as the private equity funded Hinkley Point C in the UK, needed some kind of state guarantee such as long-term power purchase agreements.

Niasa identified six financing options that could be used to fund a new nuclear programme. The first was state funding for the entire project or state provided sovereign loan guarantees using reserves and cash flows from state-owned companies, as was the case with the United Arab Emirates’ Barakah project.

Date: Wednesday, 20 May 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/industry-association-proposes-financing-options-for-new-build-5-2-2020

The main challenges facing the nuclear industry are not in the production and delivery of electricity, but in securing the policy support required for it to expand its contribution of sustainable and low-carbon energy. This was the message of Philippe Costes, senior advisor at World Nuclear Assocation, to delegates at the Nuclear Power Plants Expo & Summit in Istanbul this week.

Date: Friday, 06 March 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Speech-Policy-support-for-nuclear-in-the-global-en

Agency 2019 data shows coal still strong in Asia, but on retreat in advanced economies IEA director Fatih Birol speaking at the IEA Ministerial Meeting; Paris, November 2017. Photo courtesy Andrew Wheeler/IEA. Newly released data by the International Energy Agency (IEA) has shown that global CO2 emissions from energy generation flattened in 2019 at about 33 gigatonnes (Gt) mainly thanks to gains in advanced economies* because of the expanding role of renewable sources, a fuel transition from coal to natural gas, and higher nuclear power output.

The IEA said CO2 emissions remained unchanged from their 2018 levels, although the global economy expanded by 2.9%. The data shows that emissions remained largely stable between 2013 and 2016 and then experienced two years of consecutive growth in 2017 and 2018. An IEA chart showing CO2 emissions since 1990 (orange for advanced economies, yellow of rest of the world). Image courtesy IEA.

According to the IEA, increased nuclear power generation in advanced economies, particularly in Japan and South Korea, avoided the release of over 50 megatonnes (Mt) of CO2 in 2019.

Date: Thursday, 13 February 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/iea-report-says-global-co2-emissions-remained-stable-in-2019-2-3-2020

A new animation from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) shows that global nuclear generation will need to significantly expand beyond its historical markets if the world is to have a reasonable chance at meeting climate change goals.

Date: Tuesday, 11 February 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-data-animation-shows-nuclear-to-be-key-to-combatting-climate-change-7765212

Nuclear power provides 10% of global electricity, but to stem climate change the world is going to need far greater amounts of clean and reliable energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) says in a short film it published today. To tackle climate change, 80% of all electricity will need to be low carbon by 2050.

Date: Tuesday, 14 January 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-explains-nuclears-vital-role-in-a-carbon-free

Nuclear power provides 10% of global electricity, but to stem climate change the world is going to need far greater amounts of clean and reliable energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) says in a short film it published today. To tackle climate change, 80% of all electricity will need to be low carbon by 2050.

Date: Thursday, 09 January 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-explains-nuclears-vital-role-in-a-carbon-free

A policy and market environment that unlocks the mitigation potential of nuclear power will enable countries to adopt more ambitious targets in their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement, a paper prepared by Hal Turton, an energy economist in the Department of Nuclear Energy at the International Atomic Energy Agency shows. The paper, Nuclear Power and Climate Change: Scenario Perspectives to 2050, was presented last week at the Vienna-based agency's first international conference on climate change and the role of nuclear power.

Date: Thursday, 17 October 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/The-untapped-potential-of-nuclear-under-the-Paris