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US company to build a proposed medical isotope facility in Janesville, WI The US nuclear regulator has published in the Federal Register a notice of opportunity for submissions regarding a “first of a kind” application by Shine Medical Technologies to operate a proposed medical isotope production facility that does not require a nuclear reactor.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said submissions must be filed by 10 March 2020 by anyone who wishes to participate in the hearing process for the application.

Shine has proposed to construct and operate a facility in Janesville, Wisconsin for the production of the radioisotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) through the irradiation and processing of a uranyl sulfate solution. The company said this patented process replaces a nuclear reactor with a low-energy, accelerator-based neutron source. 

This source functions by colliding deuterium ions with tritium gas to cause fusion. The fusion reaction results in high energy neutrons and helium-4. In other words, the accelerator takes a radioactive by-product created by nuclear power plants (tritium) and turns it into the same clean, harmless gas used to make balloons float.

Date: Wednesday, 15 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/nrc-calls-for-submissions-on-first-of-a-kind-production-facility-1-2-2020

An International Atomic Energy Agency team said Latvia is committed to strengthening its regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety, but needs to develop its national waste management policy.

The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) team this week concluded a 10-day mission to review the regulatory safety framework in Latvia.

The team said the government should include all IAEA safety fundamentals in a national policy and strategy for safety that covers all facilities and activities. It should also develop a national policy to define long-term goals for the safe management of all classes of existing and future radioactive waste streams.

“The Latvian infrastructure for nuclear safety and radiation protection was created only after independence in 1990. Considering this relatively short history, the legal and regulatory system and controls are very well-developed,” said team leader Ilmar Puskar, head of the radiation safety department at the Estonian environmental board.

Date: Saturday, 02 November 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/iaea-calls-for-development-of-waste-management-policy-11-5-2019

Canada’s Saskatchewan Research Council has announced that its Safe Low Power Kritical Experiment (Slowpoke) research reactor has been defuelled in preparation for its decommissioning, and the fuel has been transported to the USA without incident.

Date: Wednesday, 02 October 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newssaskatchewan-slowpoke-reactor-ready-for-decommissioning-7431063

Ahead of its decommissioning, the low-enriched uranium fuel has been removed from the Saskatchewan Research Council's (SRC's) Slowpoke-2 research reactor in Saskatoon and transported to the USA.

Date: Saturday, 28 September 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Defuelling-completed-at-Canadian-research-reactor

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARR) team said the operator of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) has demonstrated a high commitment to enhancing safety following the conversion of the reactor core to use low enriched uranium (LEU) as fuel instead of high enriched uranium (HEU). The team also made recommendations for further strengthening safety. The four-member team comprised experts from India, Jamaica and the IAEA.

Date: Wednesday, 28 August 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-team-assesses-nigerian-research-reactor-safety-7378872

The operator of the Nigerian Research Reactor-1, known as NIRR-1, has shown a high commitment to safety following the conversion of the reactor core to use low-enriched uranium as fuel instead of high-enriched uranium, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It made a number of recommendations to the Nigeria Atomic Energy Commission (NAEC) to further enhance safety.

Date: Wednesday, 28 August 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Nigerian-research-reactor-operator-committed-to-sa

An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARR) team said the operator of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) has demonstrated a high commitment to enhancing safety following the conversion of the reactor core to use low enriched uranium (LEU) as fuel instead of high enriched uranium (HEU). The team also made recommendations for further strengthening safety. The four-member team comprised experts from India, Jamaica and the IAEA.

Date: Thursday, 22 August 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsiaea-team-assesses-nigerian-research-reactor-safety-7378872

Ghana has commissioned three new nuclear faciliies – the Low-Enriched Uranium Core Research Reactor Facility, the International Miniature Neutron Source Reactor Training Facility and the Radiological and Medical Science Research Institute Laboratories building at the Scientific Research and Development Institution of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC).

Date: Tuesday, 13 August 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsghana-commissions-three-nuclear-facilities-7366131

The operator of the Nigerian Research Reactor-1, known as NIRR-1, has shown a high commitment to safety following the conversion of the reactor core to use low-enriched uranium as fuel instead of high-enriched uranium, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It made a number of recommendations to the Nigeria Atomic Energy Commission (NAEC) to further enhance safety.

Date: Monday, 12 August 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Nigerian-research-reactor-operator-committed-to-sa

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has announced $49.3m (€43.5m) in funding for nuclear energy research projects in 25 states as part of the government’s Nuclear Energy University Programme (NEUP) and Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) programmes, a DOE statement said.

The funds will cover facility access, cross-cutting technology development, and infrastructure awards for 58 advanced nuclear technology projects, the statement said.

The DOE said $28.5m (€25.1m) under NEUP will support 40 university-led nuclear energy research and development projects in 23 states. Seven other university-led projects will receive more than $1.6m for research reactor and infrastructure improvements providing important safety, performance and student education-related upgrades to a part of the US’ 25 university research reactors.

Date: Tuesday, 02 July 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/doe-announces-close-to-usd50-million-in-funding-for-nuclear-energy-projects-7-2-2019