Latest News

Filters

Filter by tags: Small modular reactor Clear all tag filters

151 news articles found


A Memorandum of Understanding has been signed by Energy Northwest, Grant County Public Utility District and X-energy to form a partnership to support the development and commercial demonstration of the USA's first advanced nuclear reactor. The TRi Energy Partnership aims to construct a plant based on X-energy's Xe-100 reactor design at Energy Northwest's existing Columbia site in Washington.

Date: Wednesday, 07 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Partnership-formed-for-advanced-reactor-deployment

Japanese engineering, procurement, and construction firm JGC Holdings Corporation (JGC HD) has agreed to invest USD40 million in small modular reactor developer NuScale Power. It will also partner with Fluor Corporation - NuScale's majority investor - on the deployment of NuScale power plants.

Date: Wednesday, 07 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Japans-JGC-invests-in-NuScale-Power

First concrete was poured on 31 March for the basemat of unit 3 at China Huaneng’s Changjiang NPP in Hainan province after the National Nuclear Safety Administration issued a construction licence for Changjiang 3&4 (phase II) - both Hualong One units. The construction period is expected to be 60 months. Construction of unit 4 is scheduled to start in 10 months. Both units are due to enter commercial operations by the end of 2026. This is the first nuclear power project to be constructed in China during the 14th Five-Year Plan period. The total investment is estimated to be nearly CNY40 billion ($6bn).

Date: Friday, 02 April 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfirst-concrete-poured-for-chinas-changjiang-3-8644649

First concrete has been poured today for the basemat of unit 3 at the Changjiang nuclear power plant in China's Hainan province. The move came after the National Nuclear Safety Administration issued a construction licence to China Huaneng Group for the construction of units 3 and 4 at the site. The Hualong One units will be the first large pressurised water reactor project in which Huaneng will hold a controlling stake.

Date: Thursday, 01 April 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Construction-permit-for-second-phase-of-Changjiang

The Darlington nuclear site, where OPG wants to build an SMR. Courtesy OPG. Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has applied to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission for renewal of the site preparation licence for the Darlington new nuclear project, the Organisation of Canadian Nuclear Industries (OCNI) said.

In 2012, following the acceptance of an environmental assessment, the CNSC granted OPG a licence to allow site preparation activities to support future nuclear generation.

The application for renewal of the licence will be considered by the CNSC at a public hearing scheduled to take place on 9 and 10 June 2021.

Darlington is the only site in Canada currently licensed for new nuclear. OPG owns and operates the Pickering and Darlington nuclear stations in Ontario.

Additional generation at Darlington would allow low-carbon, reliable nuclear energy to continue being an important part of Ontario’s energy mix, the OCNI said. Renewal of the licence would be one step in a series of licences and regulatory approvals needed before the construction and operation of a new reactor.

Date: Tuesday, 23 March 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/opg-applies-for-renewal-of-darlington-nuclear-site-licence-3-1-2021

The UKSMR consortium led by Rolls-Royce said on 15 March that it had joined European nuclear trade association Foratom, “as it develops its global reach and eyes a vibrant export market”. The UKSMR consortium is designing a low-cost factory built small modular reactor (SMR).

Date: Friday, 19 March 2021
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsuksmr-consortium-joins-foratom-8609358

Ottawa says investment will play ‘critical role’ in plans for world-class, non-emitting energy system A computer-generated image of the proposed Moltex SMR power plant. Courtesy Moltex. The government of Canada is investing CAD50.5m ($40.5m) in Moltex Energy to design and commercialise a molten salt reactor and spent fuel recycling facility that could lead to the country operating the world’s first such unit by the early 2030s.

This funding will help Moltex develop a reactor that will produce emissions-free energy through a process that recycles existing used nuclear fuel to produce non-emitting energy. The government said the technology has the potential to reduce storage needs for existing used nuclear fuel and could lead the way in establishing a first-of-its-kind, world-class non-emitting-energy system for Canada and the world.

“Our government supports the use of this innovative technology to help deliver cleaner energy sources and build on Canada’s global leadership in small nuclear reactors,” said François-Philippe Champagne, minister of innovation, science and industry.

He said Canada must lay the foundation for a better-prepared, healthier and more prosperous country. “The investment announced today will play a critical role in fighting climate change and will boost Canada’s economic stabilisation after the [Covid-19] pandemic,” he said.

Date: Friday, 19 March 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/government-announces-cad50-5-million-funding-for-moltex-smr-3-4-2021

The Canadian government has announced investments totalling just over CAD56 million (USD45 million) to support the development of small modular reactor (SMR) research and technology in New Brunswick. The package includes an investment of CAD50.5 million in Moltex Energy Ltd to develop its 300 MW Stable Salt Reactor-Wasteburner (SSR-W). Meanwhile, a new report has underlined the potential economic benefits from SMRs for Canadian provinces.

Date: Friday, 19 March 2021
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Canadian-government-invests-in-SMR-project

A computer-generated image of a proposed UKSMR nuclear power plant. Courtesy Rolls-Royce. The UKSMR (UK small modular reactor) consortium led by Rolls-Royce has joined the Brussels-based European nuclear industry group Foratom, Rolls-Royce announced.

The consortium is designing a low-cost factory built SMR. According to Rolls-Royce, the plant’s standardised, factory-made components and advanced manufacturing processes push costs down, while the rapid assembly of the modules and components inside a weatherproof canopy on the power station site itself avoids costly schedule disruptions.

Tom Samson, interim chief executive officer of the UKSMR consortium, said nuclear power is central to tackling climate change, economic recovery and energy security. “To do this it must be affordable, reliable and investable and the way we manufacture and assemble our power station brings its cost down to be comparable with offshore wind.”

Foratom director-general Yves Desbazeille, said the topic of SMRs is gaining momentum in the European Union as there are discussions on how the technology could fit into Europe’s future energy mix. “We are happy to be able to benefit from the expertise of the UKSMR consortium and its experts in this field in order to ensure that the potential of SMRs is fully recognised by EU decision makers,” he said.

Date: Wednesday, 17 March 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/rolls-royce-smr-consortium-joins-european-industry-group-foratom-3-2-2021

The Bruce nuclear power station in Canada. Courtesy Bruce Power. The licensing process for an “aggressive” programme of siting 1,000 MW class commercial nuclear power reactors should begin immediately if Canada is to meet its net-zero electricity targets, a report by Canada-based engineering company SNC-Lavalin says.

According to the report, one such reactor could be brought into service every year from 2030 to 2050. Once small modular reactor designs are complete, three 300-MW SMR units could be added to the grid each year from around 2035 to 2050.

While aggressive, this accelerated new-build scenario is less than the nuclear new build rates that both China and India are achieving today, the report says.

The report says significant new clean electrical capacity will be needed to achieve net-zero carbon by 2050. Canada will need to triple its power production levels over the next 30 years. This will require the development of all the available zero-carbon generation technologies simultaneously including offshore wind in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, hydro plants in remote locations, and “large nuclear facilities across Canada”.

Date: Saturday, 13 March 2021
Original article: nucnet.org/news/snc-lavalin-report-calls-for-aggressive-nuclear-new-build-programme-3-5-2021