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New-build projects are making progress, but governments are still struggling with finding the right financing package for large reactors The delayed Flamanville-3 is one of three EPR units under construction in Europe. The others are at Olkiluoto in Finland and Hinkley Point in the UK. Photo courtesy EDF. Western Europe

The UK is facing a major challenge to replace its aging fleet of Generation I nuclear power plants, many of which are scheduled to shut down in 2023.

The project by French state utility EDF to build two Generation III EPR units at Hinkley Point C in Somerset is on track for connection to the grid by 2025. Once in commercial operation the two units will provide up to 7% of the total electricity demand. Two similar units are planned for the Sizewell site in Suffolk.

However, press reports have suggested EDF is in “a race against time” to secure a funding deal for Sizewell C as delays risk making the project prohibitively expensive.

According to The Times newspaper EDF has hired Rothschild as financial adviser for the project and says it wants a “definitive way forward” from the government this year so it can start construction in 2022.

Date: Friday, 17 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/what-lies-in-store-in-2020-1-4-2020

Leonam Guimaraes, president of Brazil's state nuclear power company Eletronuclear, told Reuters that Brazil plans to complete the delayed unit 3 at its Angra NPP in partnership with either China's National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), France's EDF or Russia state nuclear corporation Rosatom.

Date: Wednesday, 30 October 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsbrazil-seeks-partners-to-complete-angra-3-7478476

Nuclear energy has faced serious challenges in recent years because of several factors: competition from low gas prices, subsidised renewables and slow growth in electricity demand in certain markets. But because of several powerful forces we are seeing signs that this year nuclear energy will come roaring back, writes Jarret Adams.

Date: Wednesday, 07 March 2018
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Five-reasons-nuclear-energy-will-rebound-in-2018

The CEO of German energy industry giant Siemens, Peter Löscher, has publicly stated that the company will withdraw its remaining nuclear power offerings and leave the industry. His announcment came during an interview with German newspaper Der Spiegel. Siemens played a major part in the expanding nuclear deployment of the 1970s and 1980s. The Kraftwerk Union technology became part of the entire German nuclear fleet, while reactors were also exported to Argentina (Atucha 2), the Netherlands (Borssele), Switzerland (Goesgen) and Spain (Trillo 1).

Date: Thursday, 22 September 2011
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newssiemens-to-quit-the-nuclear-power-business-721