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Agency 2019 data shows coal still strong in Asia, but on retreat in advanced economies IEA director Fatih Birol speaking at the IEA Ministerial Meeting; Paris, November 2017. Photo courtesy Andrew Wheeler/IEA. Newly released data by the International Energy Agency (IEA) has shown that global CO2 emissions from energy generation flattened in 2019 at about 33 gigatonnes (Gt) mainly thanks to gains in advanced economies* because of the expanding role of renewable sources, a fuel transition from coal to natural gas, and higher nuclear power output.

The IEA said CO2 emissions remained unchanged from their 2018 levels, although the global economy expanded by 2.9%. The data shows that emissions remained largely stable between 2013 and 2016 and then experienced two years of consecutive growth in 2017 and 2018. An IEA chart showing CO2 emissions since 1990 (orange for advanced economies, yellow of rest of the world). Image courtesy IEA.

According to the IEA, increased nuclear power generation in advanced economies, particularly in Japan and South Korea, avoided the release of over 50 megatonnes (Mt) of CO2 in 2019.

Date: Thursday, 13 February 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/iea-report-says-global-co2-emissions-remained-stable-in-2019-2-3-2020

Despite widespread expectations of another increase, global energy-related CO2 emissions stopped growing in 2019, according to International Energy Agency (IEA) data released today. After two years of growth, global emissions were unchanged at 33 gigatonnes in 2019 even as the world economy expanded by 2.9%.

Date: Wednesday, 12 February 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Global-CO2-emissions-flatlined-in-2019-says-IEA

New-build projects are making progress, but governments are still struggling with finding the right financing package for large reactors The delayed Flamanville-3 is one of three EPR units under construction in Europe. The others are at Olkiluoto in Finland and Hinkley Point in the UK. Photo courtesy EDF. Western Europe

The UK is facing a major challenge to replace its aging fleet of Generation I nuclear power plants, many of which are scheduled to shut down in 2023.

The project by French state utility EDF to build two Generation III EPR units at Hinkley Point C in Somerset is on track for connection to the grid by 2025. Once in commercial operation the two units will provide up to 7% of the total electricity demand. Two similar units are planned for the Sizewell site in Suffolk.

However, press reports have suggested EDF is in “a race against time” to secure a funding deal for Sizewell C as delays risk making the project prohibitively expensive.

According to The Times newspaper EDF has hired Rothschild as financial adviser for the project and says it wants a “definitive way forward” from the government this year so it can start construction in 2022.

Date: Friday, 17 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/what-lies-in-store-in-2020-1-4-2020

The procedure for selecting a strategic investor for Bulgaria’s Belene NPP project was published in the C176 issue in the Official Journal of the European Union on 22 May. When Bulgarian state energy company NEK announced the start of the procedure in March, it said the call for interest would become effective after being published in the journal, after which parties would have 90 days to apply and 12 months to complete the process. NEK said it would be looking for an investor for the construction of Belene with options to take a minority stake in a future project company or purchase electricity to be generated by the facility. The purpose of the call for interest is to gather information about potential candidates while Bulgaria will participate in the project company by contributing assets including the licensed site, nuclear island equipment, permits and documentation. According to the call for interest, the station must be operational within 10 years from the signing of an investors’ agreement and its cost must not exceed €10bn for both units. France’s Framatome, China’s CNNC, Russia’s Rosatom and US-based General Electric have already formally expressed an interest in investing or providing equipment and services for Belene. Talks have also been held with South Korea’s Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power.

Date: Friday, 24 May 2019
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsbulgaria-launches-call-for-strategic-investor-for-belene-npp-7224432

23 May (NucNet): Bulgaria has published a call for interest for potential investors in the two-unit Belene nuclear power station project in the Official Journal of the European Union, staring an investor selection procedure first announced on 11 March.

The call for interest was published on 22 May, just days after Bulgarian energy minister Temenuzhka Petkova told local media publication was expected in June because of delays with the preparation of related documentation.

Interested parties now have 90 days to apply and 12 months to complete the procedure.

In March, Bulgarian state energy company NEK said it would be looking for an investor for the construction of Belene with options to take a minority stake in a future project company or purchase electricity to be generated by the facility.

NEK has said it will participate in the project company by contributing assets including the licensed site, nuclear island equipment, permits and documentation.

According to the call for interest, the new nuclear station must be operational within 10 years of the signing of an investors’ agreement and its cost must not exceed €10bn for both units.

In 2008, Bulgaria ordered two Russian VVER-1000 pressurised water reactor units for Belene, but the project was cancelled in 2012 because of financial and political considerations.

In June 2018, the government formally revived the project following a vote in parliament.

A 2016 arbitration settlement awarded Bulgaria most of the nuclear equipment already produced by Russia for Belene under the 2008 agreement.

France’s Framatome, China’s CNNC, Russia’s Rosatom and US-based General Electric have already formally expressed an interest in investing or providing equipment and services for Belene. Talks have also been held with South Korea’s Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power.

Bulgarian officials have said that if Bulgaria goes ahead with the Belene project Russia’s Atomstroyexport will be the main contractor.

The document is online: http://bit.ly/2JBMAta

Date: Thursday, 23 May 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/bulgaria-kicks-off-investor-selection-for-new-belene-units-parties-have-90-days-to-apply
21 May (NucNet): Bulgarian state energy company NEK has pushed back the formal start of the investor selection procedure for the two-unit Belene nuclear power station project because of delays in providing documentation to the Official Journal of the European Union, local media reported.

On 11 March 2019 NEK announced the start of the procedure, but said the call for interest would become effective after being published in the journal. Parties would then have 90 days to apply and 12 months to complete the procedure.

According to the Bulgarian daily Kapital, NEK was unable to publish the call for interest in the journal on time because of the requirement to translate the 100-page documentation into the 24 official EU languages.

The publication is now expected to happen in early June, said Kapital quoting Bulgarian energy minister Temenuzhka Petkova, who confirmed that preparation of the relevant documentation is under way.

In March, NEK said it would be looking for an investor for the construction of Belene with options to take a minority stake in a future project company or purchase electricity to be generated by the facility.

The purpose of the call for interest is to gather information about potential candidates, but NEK said Bulgaria will participate in the project company by contributing assets including the licensed site, nuclear island equipment, permits and documentation.

According to the call for interest, the station must be operational within 10 years from the signing of an investors’ agreement and its cost must not exceed €10bn for both units.

In 2008, Bulgaria ordered two Russian VVER-1000 pressurised water reactor units for Belene, but the project was cancelled in 2012 because of financial and political considerations.

In June 2018, the government formally revived the project following a vote in parliament.

A 2016 arbitration settlement had awarded Bulgaria most of the nuclear equipment already produced by Russia for Belene under the 2008 agreement.

France’s Framatome, China’s CNNC, Russia’s Rosatom and US-based General Electric have already formally expressed an interest in investing or providing equipment and services for Belene. Talks have also been held with South Korea’s Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power.

Bulgarian officials have said that if Bulgaria goes ahead with the Belene project Russia’s Atomstroyexport will be the main contractor.

Date: Tuesday, 21 May 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/bulgaria-delays-start-of-investor-selection-for-new-belene-units

The US administration on 2 November announced the reimposition of all US sanctions on Iran that had been lifted under the July 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). This is the second raft of penalties reimposed since President Donald Trump withdrew from JCPOA in May, and they cover Iran's shipping, financial and energy sectors. The sanctions that come into force on 5 November penalise countries that do not stop importing Iranian oil and foreign companies that do business with blacklisted Iranian entities, including the central bank, a number of private financial institutions and state-run port and shipping companies. Eight countries, identified by officials as US allies, will receive temporary waivers allowing them to continue to import Iranian petroleum products for a limited period. Pompeo did not identify the countries to be granted the waivers. But according to numerous reports, these include India, South Korea, Turkey, Japan and Italy.

Date: Monday, 05 November 2018
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsusa-ramps-up-sanctions-on-iran-6835977

Canada’s Minister of International Trade, François-Philippe Champagne, on 17 April signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) on possible Canadian participation in construct the fusion reactor now being built at Cadarache in France. 

Date: Monday, 30 April 2018
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newscanada-considers-rejoining-iter-6133160

Nuclear energy has faced serious challenges in recent years because of several factors: competition from low gas prices, subsidised renewables and slow growth in electricity demand in certain markets. But because of several powerful forces we are seeing signs that this year nuclear energy will come roaring back, writes Jarret Adams.

Date: Wednesday, 07 March 2018
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Five-reasons-nuclear-energy-will-rebound-in-2018