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The Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station in Japan. Japan’s nuclear regulator announced on 23 September that Tokyo Electric Power Company is fit to operate the Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear power station, based on new legally binding safety rules the company drafted and pledged to follow.

If Tepco is found to be in breach of the rules, it could be ordered to halt the station’s operations, press reports in Japan said.

Local governments must agree in the coming months to restart the seven-unit station in Niigata Prefecture, northwestern Japan.

Kashiwazaki Kariwa was not affected by the earthquake and tsunami which damaged Fukushima-Daiichi in 2011. The station’s reactors were all offline at the time following a 2007 earthquake which damaged the site but did not damage the reactors themselves.

Date: Friday, 25 September 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/regulator-says-tepco-is-fit-to-operate-kashiwazaki-kariwa-nuclear-power-station-9-4-2020

A review of the management of treated water stored at the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan has been carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). It says the two options under consideration for disposing of this water - discharge into the sea and via vapour release - are both technically feasible.

Date: Saturday, 04 April 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/IAEA-supports-discharge-of-Fukushima-Daiichi-water

Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) estimates that JPY1370 billion or $12.6 billion will be required over the next 12 years to remove melted nuclear fuel from reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Date: Friday, 03 April 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newstepco-reports-on-fuel-removal-and-contaminated-water-disposal-7854118

The Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) today formally accepted a report concluding unit 2 of Tohoku Electric Power Company's Onagawa plant in Miyagi Prefecture meets revised safety standards. The plant was the closest nuclear power plant to the epicentre of the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011, but sustained far less damage than expected.

Date: Thursday, 27 February 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Japanese-regulator-approves-restart-of-Onagawa-2

Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) estimates that it will take 44 years to decommission its Fukushima Daiini nuclear power plant, located some 15km south of the accident-hit Fukushima Daiichi station.

Date: Thursday, 30 January 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfukushima-daiini-decommissioning-to-take-44-years-7743868

All 10 reactors in Fukushima prefecture are set to be permanently shut down The Fukushima-Daini nuclear power stationn in Japan. Photo courtesy NRA. Tokyo Electric Power Company has estimated that it will take 44 years to decommission the four-unit Fukushima-Daini nuclear power station, about 12 km south of the bigger Fukushima-Daiichi facility where three reactors melted down after an earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

Tepco decided in July 2019 that it would permanently close the facility, which means all 10 nuclear reactor units in the northeastern prefecture of Fukushima, including the six at Fukushima-Daiichi, will be decommissioned.

The company presented the outline of decommissioning plans to the municipal assembly of Tomioka, one of the two host towns of the nuclear station.

The utility estimated the cost of decommissioning Fukushima-Daini at 280 billion yen ($2.59bn).

According to the outline, the decommissioning process for Fukushima-Daini will have four stages, taking 10 years for the first stage, 12 years for the second stage and 11 years each for the third and fourth stages.

Date: Tuesday, 28 January 2020
Original article: nucnet.org/news/tepco-says-decommissioning-will-take-44-years-1-1-2020

The trial removal of fuel debris from the damaged reactors at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant will begin at unit 2 in 2021, according to the latest revision to the mid and long-term roadmap towards decommissioning the plant. Meanwhile, the removal of fuel from the storage pools at units 1 and 2 has been delayed by up to five years.

Date: Tuesday, 14 January 2020
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Revisions-to-Fukushima-Daiichi-decommissioning-roa

Japan on December 27 revised the road map for decommissioning the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, further delaying removal of thousands of used fuel assemblies that have been held in cooling pools since the 2011 earthquake.

Date: Wednesday, 01 January 2020
Original article: neimagazine.com/news/newsfukushima-decommissioning-plans-revised-7581105

The trial removal of fuel debris from the damaged reactors at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant will begin at unit 2 in 2021, according to the latest revision to the mid and long-term roadmap towards decommissioning the plant. Meanwhile, the removal of fuel from the storage pools at units 1 and 2 has been delayed by up to five years.

Date: Tuesday, 31 December 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Revisions-to-Fukushima-Daiichi-decommissioning-roa

Target is to finish cleanup at site within within 30 to 40 years of the 2011 accident The government of Japan and Tokyo Electric Power Company plan to start removing melted fuel from Unit 2 at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station in 2021, according to the latest decommissioning plan.

The draft plan, revised for the fifth time and released on 2 November, said Unit 2 was picked first for the removal process because it is safer than Units 1 and 3, which also melted down after the March 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami.

The revised draft plan will be finalised after residents and experts give their opinions to a committee of cabinet ministers related to the decommissioning and contaminated water problems at the plant.

Investigations have confirmed that debris believed to be melted nuclear fuel at the bottom of the containment vessel in the Unit 2 reactor building can be lifted by a remote-control device.

Date: Thursday, 05 December 2019
Original article: nucnet.org/news/removal-of-melted-fuel-scheduled-to-begin-at-unit-2-in-2021-12-3-2019