Vermont has become the 39th US state to take responsibility for regulating certain radioactive materials within its boundaries under an agreement with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

The state has now assumed responsibility for licensing, rulemaking, inspection and enforcement activities related to the industrial, medical and academic uses of radioactive material under the agreement, which was signed on 9 September by NRC Chairman Kristine Svinicki and on 13 September by Vermont Governor Philip Scott. It came into effect yesterday.

The NRC said it is transferring 36 academic, commercial and medical licences for radioactive material to Vermont's jurisdiction. The Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, which is being decommissioned, and federal agencies using certain nuclear material in the state, will remain under the NRC's jurisdiction.

Before entering into the agreement, the NRC determined that Vermont’s radiation control programme is adequate to protect public health and safety and is compatible with NRC regulations. The proposed agreement was published in the Federal Register for four consecutive weeks in which time one comment - supporting the agreement - was received.

Vermont assumes responsibility for licensing, rulemaking, inspection and enforcement activities related to the industrial, medical and academic uses of radioactive material. NRC retains jurisdiction over the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant, which is being decommissioned.
 
The state began the process of becoming an Agreement State in June 2015, when its then-governor, Peter Shumlin, submitted a letter of intent to the NRC.

Wyoming became the USA's 38th Agreement State, in September 2018.

Researched and written by World Nuclear News

Date: Wednesday, 02 October 2019
Original article: world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Vermont-becomes-an-Agreement-State